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Brechin Castle goes on the market with £3m price tag

The Earl of Dalhousie is selling the property, which has been owned by his family for 300 years.

Interior: Property could be turned into events venue. <strong>STV</strong>
Interior: Property could be turned into events venue. STV

By Steven McMenemy

If you’re looking for a new home and lucky enough to have a spare £3m or so to spend then what might that buy you in 2019?

How about your very own Scottish castle and estate?

That’s the price Brechin Castle in Angus has been put on the market for.

The historic listed building was reconstructed by architect Alexander Edward in the early 1700s and part of it dates back to the 13th century.

It has been put up for sale recently by the owner The Earl of Dalhousie.

The castle has been part of the family’s history for over 300 years and is the seat of the Maule and Ramsay Clans.

The Earl of Dalhousie admits it wasn’t an easy decision to offer the castle for sale.

He said: “It was very tough indeed, we took a long time wondering about it. We got a consultant in and looked at all the options.

“But a house like this has costs, considerable amounts of money and I just felt that future generations couldn’t go on spending that amount so rather than me bleeding the treasury we had to do something about it and that’s what we’ve sadly decided to do.”

The castle boasts 16 bedrooms and ten bathrooms, as well as 8 reception rooms with walls throughout adorned with historic works of art.

There’s also a walled garden on the grounds, as well as five cottages and fishing rights on the River Esk.

The castle may well be turned into a hotel and events venue or bought by a rich tycoon looking for a stunning new home.

For the Earl though, when the time comes to hand over the keys to the palatial pad to the new owner it will be a moment that will be tough to take.

He said: “It’s going to be very sad, and quite emotional. I suppose on the practical side we will live in considerably more comfort in a smaller house that we can keep heated with double glazing and easier living arrangements so there is an upside to it, but emotionally it’s going to be very sad indeed.”


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