Vaccine clinics to be set up outside Ibrox and Celtic Park

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde has announced that a vaccination bus will run between 10am and 6pm outside the venues.

The clinics will be available next week. NHSGCC
The clinics will be available next week.

Drop-in coronavirus vaccination clinics will be available outside Ibrox stadium, Celtic Park and Hampden Park next week.

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde has announced that a vaccination bus, operated by the Scottish Ambulance Service, will run between 10am and 6pm outside the venues.

The bus will be at Celtic Park during those times on Monday, July 26, at Ibrox on Tuesday, July 27, and at Hampden on Wednesday, July 28.

Moderna will be offered by the bus to anyone aged between 18 and 39 who has not yet had a first dose, or has been waiting for a second dose for more than eight weeks.

‘I’d like to thank Rangers, Celtic and Hampden Park for supporting the national vaccination programme by hosting these drop-in clinics.’

Humza Yousaf, Health secretary
ADVERT

AstraZeneca is also available for people aged 40 and older as a first dose or as a second dose to anyone who is eight weeks from their first AstraZeneca vaccination.

The Health Board is working with Glasgow City Council to identify potential additional city centre sites for the vaccination bus to visit in coming weeks.

Provisions are also being explored with universities around Greater Glasgow and Clyde ahead of student term time.

Health secretary Humza Yousaf said:  “I’d like to thank Rangers, Celtic and Hampden Park for supporting the national vaccination programme by hosting these drop-in clinics.

ADVERT

“It’s vital that we get as many people vaccinated as possible, and we know that this mobile unit, operated by the Scottish Ambulance Service, has been popular.

“I’d encourage anyone not yet vaccinated, or who had their first dose more than eight weeks ago, to go along to these if it’s convenient.”

‘Many people have worked tirelessly to ensure vaccines are available at ease and we are proud to play a small part in supporting these efforts.’

Stewart Robertson, Rangers managing director

Rangers’ managing director, Stewart Robertson, said: “As a club we are delighted to have a drop-in clinic at Ibrox and to be able to support the on-going vaccination effort.

“Being able to vaccinate as many people as possible is allowing us to return to a more normal day-to-day life, as well as welcome some fans back into the stadium on a matchday.  

“Many people have worked tirelessly to ensure vaccines are available at ease and we are proud to play a small part in supporting these efforts.”

Emilia Crighton, deputy director for public health at NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, added: “These venues have played a huge role in Glasgow’s history over the years and hold a special place in many people’s hearts.

“We’d all like to see them being used back at full capacity once again, and the key way to get there is by ensuring as many people get vaccinated as possible.

ADVERT

“This is why it’s so important that the public continues to come forward to roll up their sleeves.”


Houses evacuated as fire crews battle church blaze

More than 30 firefighters are in attendance at the scene in Glasgow.

Melissa Moore via @brunsmoore

Fire crews are tackling a well developed blaze at a church in Glasgow.

More than 30 firefighters are in attendance at the fire at St Simon’s Catholic Church on Bridge Street, Partick.

They were called to the scene at around 2.40am on Wednesday, close to Byres Road and Dumbarton Road.

The Scottish Fire and Rescue service say one person was given precautionary treatment at the scene.

ADVERT

Nearby residents have been advised to keep windows and doors closed and some have been evacuated.

/ @Brunsmoore via Melissa Moore
Fire at St Simon’s Church in Partick. (@Brunsmoore and @_catriona)

A spokesperson for the SFRS said: “We were alerted at 2.40am on Wednesday, to reports of a fire within a church on Partick Bridge Street, Partick, Glasgow.

“Operations Control mobilised six fire appliances including two height appliances and more than 30 firefighters are in attendance and working to extinguish the fire.

“One person was assisted from the property and given precautionary treatment at the scene. Adjacent properties have been evacuated as a precautionary measure and nearby residents are advised to keep windows and doors closed due to smoke.

ADVERT

“Road users should avoid the area to allow access for emergency service vehicles and due to road closures.

“Crews are expected to remain in attendance for some time.”

STV News
Damage: The fire tore through the building.

Tributes are being paid to the “loved” 162-year-old church.

Robert Hynd, Moderator of the Presbytery of Glasgow (Church of Scotland) said, “It is tragic to see such damage to a proud and historic church building. St Simon’s has an important place in the life of Partick and is particularly loved by members of Glasgow’s Polish community.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the congregation of St Simon’s. Denominations are meaningless at times such as this and we will offer whatever support we can to help in their recovery from this tragic event.”


‘We’ll never know if Gerard could have lived longer’

Mum hopes new study will help others who suffer conditions similar to those which claimed her son's life.

STV News

Gerard Garvey’s mum will never know if her son could have lived longer – but she hopes a new study will help others like him.

He was just 17 when he died in 2008 having been left extremely prone to respiratory illness by a rare chromosome abnormality, which also caused learning disabilities.

It was six months after his birth before he was diagnosed with an ‘uncoordinated swallow’, which meant food was going straight into his lungs.

“If we’d found out earlier, there might have been less damage to his chest,” his mum Mary, from Glasgow, told STV News.

ADVERT

What did the study find?

The Scottish Learning Disabilities Observatory, based at Glasgow University, examined data from more than 90,000 people with learning disabilities over the past 24 years.

It concluded that people with learning disabilities are up to 11 times more likely to die from respiratory disease than the rest of the population and called for action.

For adults with learning disabilities, the risk of death was 6.5 times greater than it was for adults in the general population.

ADVERT

The rate of death from pneumonia was almost 27 times higher.

‘He was amazing’

“Gerard was prone to infections, he was taking one after another,” Mary said. “I’ll always wonder whether, if we knew earlier about the uncoordinated swallow, would it have prevented the chest infections?

“He had multiple complex issues, but we will never know if he could have lived a bit longer.”

Mary recalled how, during his short life, Gerard repeatedly defied doctors’ expectations.

STV News
Gerard Garvey

“He was amazing,” she said. “We were told when he was born that we wouldn’t have him for long and that he wouldn’t do anything. Boy, did he prove them wrong.

“He had a condition which meant he couldn’t open his eyelids, but he learned that, if he lifted them with his thumbs, he could see what he was doing and play with his toys.

ADVERT

“Even though he was in a wheelchair, he was very boisterous, into all sorts of mischief.

“He was the centre of the family, he touched so many lives. He was absolutely amazing.”

‘Unnecessary deaths’

It’s estimated that more than 120,000 people in Scotland live with a learning disability.

The report’s lead author said many people were dying prematurely and greater awareness needed to be raised in the medical profession.

Dr Maria Truesdale said: “The research highlighted a number of inequalities in the care of people with learning disabilities.

“People with learning disabilities are dying prematurely from causes that could be prevented.

“There is an urgent need for greater understanding and awareness across health and social care of the specific health and care needs of people with learning disabilities, and in particular of the specific risk factors that contribute to premature deaths.

“We must act to now reduce preventable deaths.”

What are researchers calling for?

  • Raised awareness among doctors of the links between dysphagia and recurrent chest infections
  • Action to increase uptake of relevant vaccination programmes
  • Addressing the common risk factors related to a higher risk of respiratory-associated deaths

‘This could help others’

Meanwhile, Mary hopes that with potential health care reforms and more awareness, change will come for those with learning disabilities.

“The study could help another family,” she said. “More research is only a good thing so children and their parents can get the support they deserve.”


Police recover cannabis worth £370,000 during Glasgow raid

The raid took place on Monday, July 26.

Revolu7ion93 via IStock
Police Scotland said removing drugs from the streets remains a priority.

Police have recovered cannabis worth an estimated £370,000 during a raid in Glasgow.

The drugs were found, as well as a five-figure sum of money, by officers during a search of a property on Walton Street, on Monday, July 26.

A 30-year-old man appeared at Glasgow Sheriff Court on Tuesday.

Also on Monday, police stopped a car on Deanston Drive in Glasgow and recovered cannabis worth around £10,000 and a four-figure sum of money.

ADVERT

A man was charged in connection with drugs offences after the recovery.

Detective Inspector Alan Ferguson of Great Glasgow CID said: “Removing drugs from our streets remains a priority for officers. 

“I would ask anyone with any information about drug activity in their area to report this to us so that we can investigate thoroughly.”

“Anyone with information should call Police Scotland on 101 or alternatively Crimestoppers can be contacted on 0800 555 111, where anonymity can be maintained.”


Police appeal after man is seriously assaulted in Pollok

The incident took place in the early hours of Sunday, July 25 at around 12.30am.

georgeclerk via IStock
A police appeal for information has been launched.

A police appeal has been launched after a man was seriously assaulted in Pollok.

The incident took place in the early hours of Sunday, July 25 at around 12.30am.

Officers were called to Linthaugh Road, following a report of a 34-year-old man injured during an altercation in Ladymuir Crescent.

Emergency services attended the scene, with the man taken to the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital where he was treated for facial lacerations.

ADVERT

Detective Constable Emma Nicolson said: “Our enquiries are continuing to identify the group of men and women who were involved in this incident.

“We are studying CCTV footage and I would urge anyone who was in the area at the time with information, mobile phone footage or who has dash-cam footage to contact us as soon as possible.

”Anyone with information should contact officers through 101 quoting reference 0149 of July 25.

“Alternatively Crimestoppers can be contacted on 0800 555 111, where anonymity can be maintained.”


Man left partner scarred for life during attack on her sister

Christopher Milligan has been remanded in custody pending background reports for the assaults in 2019.

Mark Scates via SNS Group
Court: Christopher Milligan has been remanded in custody pending background reports.

A man scarred his partner for life after smashing her head with a glass object.

Christopher Milligan, 35, turned on Caroline McCormack, 29, at a flat in Glasgow’s Thornliebank on September 1, 2019.

Milligan lashed out after Caroline intervened on him attacking her 25-year-old younger sister Laura.

Caroline needed eight stitches for her head wound while Laura suffered bruising to her face.

ADVERT

On Tuesday, Milligan pleaded guilty at Glasgow Sheriff Court to assaulting Caroline to her injury and permanent disfigurement.

He also admitted the assault to Laura’s injury and will be sentenced next month.

The court heard that Milligan and Caroline were an “on-off” couple that were together for two years before the incident.

The trio were at a friend’s house drinking alcohol before an argument broke out.

ADVERT

Milligan then brandished a kitchen knife towards Laura.

Prosecutor Mark Allan said: “Caroline heard the disturbance and entered the room to see Milligan on top of her sister repeatedly punching her head.

“Caroline intervened to push Milligan away but he struck her to the head with a glass object.

“This left her bleeding from her head before Milligan departed the scene.”

The women were taken to the city’s Queen Elizabeth University Hospital for treatment.

Mr Allan said: “Caroline had a 4.5cm wound to the right side of her forehead which was closed by eight stitches.

“It will leave a permanent scar on her head.

ADVERT

“Laura had a one-centimetre wound on her head and needed two stitches on her scalp.

“She also had bruising to her forehead and cheekbones.”

Neal McShane, defending, told the court: “He asked me to say he is ashamed by what occurred.”

Sheriff Iain Fleming remanded Milligan in custody pending background reports.


Man once branded a ‘savage’ jailed for nurse attack

Scott McClymont, 22, turned on the 21-year-old woman at Glasgow’s Royal Infirmary on December 28, 2020.

Scottish Courts and Tribunal Service via Website
Glasgow: Scott McClymont pleaded guilty on Tuesday.

A man once branded a “savage” by a judge has admitted assaulting a nurse at a hospital.

Scott McClymont, 22, turned on the 21-year-old woman at Glasgow’s Royal Infirmary on December 28, 2020.

McClymont struck her on the body with his shoulder, forcing the nurse into the corner of a cubicle.

He later shouted and swore at officers as well as spat in a police van.

ADVERT

McClymont is currently serving a six-year sentence after pleading guilty to attempted murder at the High Court in Glasgow.

McClymont and co-accused George Murray, 33, recorded themselves torturing and slashing two terrified victims.

The pair pounced on Ryan Murray and a 15-year-old boy at a flat in Glasgow’s Springburn days after Christmas last year.

Lord Mulholland told them: “I have to say I have watched the most horrendous footage. You behaved like savages.”

ADVERT

On Tuesday, McClymont pleaded guilty at Glasgow Sheriff Court to assaulting the nurse and a male police officer.

He also admitted behaving in a threatening or abusive manner towards officers.

He was sentenced to 18 months in jail by Sheriff Iain Fleming, which will run concurrently with his current jail term.

The court heard he was taken to the hospital on an unrelated matter and was being observed by the nurse.

McClymont demanded illegal drugs before stating he was “going to go tonto”.

Prosecutor Mark Allan said: “He jumped towards [the nurse] and struck her to the body with his shoulder.

“He forced her into a corner of the treatment cubicle at the accident and emergency.”

ADVERT

McClymont was taken to the police van where he continued to shout and make threats.

Mr Allan said: “At one point he struck the walls of the cell area with his head and was repeatedly spitting.

“He tried to bite [the police officer] on the arm while he was trying to calm and remove him.”

Leon Kendol, defending, told the court: “Mr McClymont is embarrassed and remorseful for his conduct.”


Police dog tracks suspect, sniffs out shed thief – on first shift

PD Becks was praised online.

Police Scotland
Police Scotland posted about PD Becks on their Facebook page.

A police dog tracked down a suspect before sniffing out a person attempting to break into a shed nearby.

PD Becks was out getting experience on shift ahead of working at the climate change summit in Glasgow.

Police Scotland said the dog managed to track and apprehend an individual with two outstanding warrants in Paisley.

They then went on to sniff out the individual attempting to break into a shed.

ADVERT

PD Becks was praised online in response to the post by Police Scotland.


Learning disabled ‘more likely to die with respiratory illness’

A study found the risk of death was up to 11 times higher than in the general population.

PA Media via PA Ready
The Scottish Learning Disabilities Observatory examined data from more than 90,000 people.

People with learning disabilities are up to 11 times more likely to die from respiratory disease than the rest of the population, a study has found.

The Scottish Learning Disabilities Observatory, based at Glasgow University, examined data from more than 90,000 people with learning disabilities over the past 24 years.

For adults with learning disabilities the risk of death was 6.5 times greater than it was for adults in the general population.

The rate of death from pneumonia was almost 27 times higher.

ADVERT

The report’s lead author said many people were dying prematurely and greater awareness needed to be raised in the medical profession.

Dr Maria Truesdale said: “The research highlighted a number of inequalities in the care of people with learning disabilities.

“People with learning disabilities are dying prematurely from causes that could be prevented.

“There is an urgent need for greater understanding and awareness across health and social care of the specific health and care needs of people with learning disabilities, and in particular of the specific risk factors that contribute to premature deaths.

ADVERT

“We must act to now reduce preventable deaths.”

She continued: “We are calling for a number of actions including raising awareness among primary care staff of the link between dysphagia and recurrent chest infections, action to increase uptake of relevant vaccination programmes in the population with learning disabilities and practice-based approaches to address the common risk factors related to a higher risk of respiratory-associated deaths.”

The report said further research into the underlying causes would be required.


People told to shield ‘eight times more likely to get Covid’

The study was led by the University of Glasgow and published in the journal Scientific Reports.

PA Media via PA Ready
Shielding: The study was led by the University of Glasgow and published in the journal Scientific Reports.

People advised to shield during the first wave of the pandemic were eight times more likely to get Covid-19 and five times as likely to die following infection than the general population, a study has indicated.

Researchers also said people deemed at moderate risk from the virus due to health conditions like diabetes were four times more likely to have confirmed infections than the low-risk group, and five times more likely to die following confirmed infection.

The study, led by the University of Glasgow and published in the journal Scientific Reports, also showed that people aged 70 and over accounted for almost half (49.55%) of deaths in a Scottish health board.

The research – Comparison of Covid-19 outcomes among shielded and non-shielded populations – looked at patients advised to self-isolate for an extended period in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) between March and May last year.

ADVERT

The study looked at data from more than 1.3 million patients registered with GP practices in NHSGGC, of which 27,747 had been advised to shield, with a further 353,085 classed as medium risk due to health conditions.

The authors found that, compared with the remaining 934,239 people classed as low risk, people advised to shield were eight times more likely to get infected and five times more likely to die after confirmed infection.

Professor Jill Pell, director of the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Health and Wellbeing, said: “Our study highlights that to effectively protect high-risk individuals, shielding should be used alongside other population-wide measures such as physical distancing, face coverings and hand hygiene.

“Our study also showed that shielding may be of limited value in reducing burden on health services because, in spite of the shielding strategy, high-risk individuals were at increased risk of death.

ADVERT

“We believe that, to be effective as a population strategy, shielding criteria would have needed to be widely expanded to include other criteria, such as the elderly.”

In the shielded group, there were 299 (1.1%) confirmed infections and 140 (0.51%) deaths.

In the moderate-risk group, there were 1859 (0.53%) confirmed infections and 803 (0.23%) deaths, and in the low-risk group, there were 1190 (0.13%) confirmed infections and 84 (0.01%) deaths, researchers said.


You're up to date

You've read today's top stories. Where would you like to go next?