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Three men may hold key to trainee chef’s mystery death

Police believe Johnny Connelly was assaulted week before his body was pulled from water.

Johnny Connelly's family made a desperate appeal for information last month.
Johnny Connelly's family made a desperate appeal for information last month.

Three men may hold the answers to the mystery death of a trainee chef in Glasgow.

Johnny Connelly’s body was found at Spiers Wharf on Monday, July 22.

The 28-year-old from Milton, who had learning difficulties, had been reported missing a week earlier and police now want to three men spotted near where he was last seen.

When he was found, injuries to Johnny’s head and body suggested he had been assaulted on the day of his death.

And speaking to STV News shortly before Christmas, Johnny’s family made a desperate plea for answers.

His mum Norah said: “I just want to give my son a cuddle and tell him that I love him. All I’ve got is his ashes in an urn. Johnny was irreplaceable, my friend. I can’t imagine life without him.”

Johnny Connelly and his twin sister Norah, left, and elder sister Michelle.

Detectives said they had taken more than 50 statements during their investigation and have now pinpointed three men they want to trace.

The were seen near the underpass or stairs leading from Garscube Road around 10.25pm on the night Johnny was last seen.

Police said they were white, aged between 30-45, had Scottish accents and were wearing jeans and sports clothing.

Detective inspector John Morrison said:  “Johnny was a loving son, brother and a much-loved uncle. His family is still trying to come to terms with his loss and just want to know what happened to him. 

“Not knowing what happened or how he came to his death is causing them added anguish and sorrow.  We remain committed to finding out what happened to Johnny and finding answers for the family devastated by his death.

“I am appealing to these three men to contact us, they may think they don’t know anything but I am asking them to let us be the judge of that. 

“A small piece of information, which may seem insignificant, could be vital to us as we build up a picture of what has happened.  I am also re-appealing to the public to consider whether they too have information which could be relevant. 

“Anyone losing a loved one is entitled to know what happened to them.  Please contact us and pass your information on.”


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