Visitor attraction damaged by 3.3-magnitude earthquake to reopen

Traditional buildings were damaged by the earthquake in November last year, forcing several to be repaired.

Scottish visitor attraction damaged by 3.3-magnitude earthquake set to reopen to visitors Auchindrain Township
Auchindrain was at the centre of a 3.3-magnitude quake in November last year.

A Scottish visitor attraction shaken by an earthquake last year is set to reopen to visitors after more than six months of repairs.

Auchindrain, Scotland’s last surviving township, was damaged by the 3.3 magnitude quake that struck Argyll in November.

A number of 18th-century buildings at the site – many of which are built from interlocked stonework – were badly stricken by the geological event and have been deemed unsafe.

However others in the small, preserved farming community will be open to pre-booked, guided tours from June 1 following “expert emergency repairs” carried out by a team of volunteers.

Further work is expected to continue into the Autumn to make the area safe.

Director Bob Clark said: “The earthquake took its toll on a number of our buildings and, as a result, we will have to limit access to guided tours only until the buildings are made safe for visitors. 

“We attract thousands of visitors every year keen to see and experience what life was like in the past in rural Scotland. 

“There were once thousands of small independent farming communities, known as townships, spread across Scotland but today Auchindrain is the only remaining living example. 

“We are proud to be able to help people see and enjoy this special and now unique part of Scottish history and will continue to work hard to preserve it for the future.”

The earthquake was recorded just before 02.00 on Tuesday, November 16.

Experts from the British Geological Survey said its epicentre was west of Lochgilphead – close to the location of Auchindrain.