Man accused of offering to help woman ‘take her own life’

Craig McInally, 29, appeared at the High Court in Glasgow on Thursday.

Court: Craig McInally, 29, appeared at the High Court in Glasgow on Thursday. MachineHeadz via IStock
Court: Craig McInally, 29, appeared at the High Court in Glasgow on Thursday.

A man is to stand trial accused of trying to kill a woman having allegedly offered to help her take her own life.

Craig McInally, 29, faces the claim which allegedly occurred between November and December 2019.

He is said to have contacted the woman via the Sanctioned Suicide website and WhatsApp messaging service.

The indictment states McInally did offer her the drug diazepam to “assist with asphyxiation”.

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McInally did allegedly then “induce her” to allow him to “assist with her suicide”.

He is said to have invited her to his home in Glasgow’s Ibrox.

It is claimed he then sexually assaulted her with further accusations including her being suspended by the neck from a cord attached to a ceiling pulley.

It is also alleged McInally got her to take off her clothes with her wrists then bound with handcuffs.

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Lawyers for McInally had previously pled not guilty on his behalf to attempted murder at a hearing at the High Court in Glasgow.

It has been confirmed a trial has now been set for November 29 in Edinburgh.


Three children and woman hit by car as ten ambulances sent to scene

Ten ambulances were dispatched to the scene in Carluke, South Lanarkshire.

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The Scottish Ambulance Service said the incident was ongoing.

Ten ambulances have been sent to the scene of a crash in which three children and a woman were struck by a car.

Emergency services were called to Kirkton Street in Carluke, South Lanarkshire, shortly after 3pm on Wednesday.

A woman in her 20s and three children have been taken to the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow.

The Scottish Ambulance Service said the incident was ongoing.

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Carluke, South Lanarkshire.
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A Scottish Ambulance Service spokesperson said: “We received a call at 3.07pm to attend an incident on Kirkton Street, Carluke and dispatched 10 resources to the scene.

“One female in her twenties and three children have been transported to the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow.” 

Inspector William Broatch, from Motherwell Road Policing Unit, said: “Around 3.10pm, police were called to James Street in Carluke, at the junction with Kirkton Street, following a report of a road crash involving a car and four pedestrians – a woman and three children.

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Junction of Kirkton Street and James Street in Carluke.

“The pedestrians are all being conveyed to hospital for treatment. Emergency services remain at the scene and local diversions are in place.

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“Anyone with information on the incident can call police on 101, quoting incident 2110 of October 27.”

More to follow.


RMT sets out final demands to avert rail strikes during COP26

ScotRail says it is giving 'due consideration' to new proposal just days before UN climate conference gets under way in Glasgow.

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RMT union has issued final demand to avert ScotRail staff going on strike.

The RMT union has issued its final demand to avert ScotRail train staff striking during COP26, ahead of the Scottish Government’s deadline.

The trade union has set out its final negotiating position, calling for a 2.5% pay rise backdated to April and a “COP26 payment” for all staff.

A spokesperson for ScotRail said the company was giving the proposal “due consideration”.

World leaders and thousands of delegates are set to arrive in Glasgow for the United Nations climate summit, but the 13-day event has been threatened with disruption caused by rail strikes.

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The Scottish Government and ScotRail imposed a deadline of 5pm on Wednesday for a resolution to the dispute over pay and conditions.

A Transport Scotland spokesman said the letter from RMT general secretary Mike Lynch had been received before the deadline but no decision had been reached.

Setting out the demands to avoid RMT members striking for the duration of the climate summit, Lynch also asked for three hours booking-on allowance and a new pay and conditions review by April 1, 2022.

Lynch said: “We are making this offer in good faith with the sole intention of breaking the current deadlock and allowing us to make progress as the clock ticks down to COP26.

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“We await a positive response from the company.”

Other unions have accepted the deal on the table, but Scotland’s transport minister, Graeme Dey, had warned he was “not optimistic” that a resolution would be reached with the RMT before the deadline set for 5pm on Wednesday.

Dey is already facing calls to quit if a deal cannot be reached to prevent the strike during Cop26, which is expected to bring around 30,000 people to Glasgow.

Speaking at Holyrood on Tuesday afternoon, Dey accused the RMT of changing its counter-proposals, and said: “Multiple times over recent weeks, we have been led directly and publicly to believe that there was a possible resolution of this dispute.

“This Government and ScotRail reached out on all occasions, only to find the goalposts moved. It has been very difficult to establish trust in this process.”

In response, Lynch said: “This inflammatory language helps no-one.

“We are not going to indulge in digging deeper trenches when there is ample time to resolve these disputes if we get talks back on.

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“We are ready and waiting to get back round the table and Dey should be focusing his efforts on making that happen.”

David Simpson, ScotRail operations director, said the 5pm deadline had been set to give ScotRail time to plan for services during the summit, which gets under way on Sunday and runs through to November 12.

After 5pm on Wednesday, he said the offer would be “off the table”, explaining: “The reason for the deadline is we need to be able to prepare for what service we operate next week.

“We are working in the background on some contingency planning to see what we can run in the event of a strike to connect Glasgow and Edinburgh and serve the routes through the COP26 summit.

“We’ve made very clear this is a significant deal but at 5pm tonight it is off the table and we will have to sadly prepare for industrial action.”

That would see ScotRail focus efforts on running services between Scotland’s two largest cities, Glasgow and Edinburgh, as well as the low-level service to the Scottish Event Campus where the summit is taking place.

Simpson said: “We absolutely urge RMT to accept this deal, it is a good deal, at least put it to their members and pause the strike action while they do that, or it comes off the table at 5pm tonight.”

More on:

Man found guilty of terrorism after online mosque attack plot

Sam Imrie, 24, posted messages on social media claiming he was planning to attack Fife Islamic Centre in Glenrothes. 

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Guilty: Sam Imrie.

A man has been found guilty of terrorism and other offences after he threatened to set fire to an Islamic centre in Fife.

Sam Imrie, 24, was arrested after detectives discovered in July 2019 that he had been posting messages on social media claiming he was planning to attack Fife Islamic Centre in Glenrothes. 

Police who searched his home at Colliston Avenue in Glenrothes also made a number of other discoveries.

Officers found Imrie had acquired an arsenal of weapons, which included a combat knife, nunchucks, an axe, a knife, a hammer, a rife scope and a wooden-handled lock knife.  

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Prosecutor Lisa Gillespie QC told the court how the police also recovered a “manifesto” entitled the “Great Replacement” by far right terrorist Brenton Tarrant, who murdered 51 people when he attacked two mosques in New Zealand in March 2019.

They also recovered a manifesto written by Anders Breivik, another fascist who slaughtered 77 people in attacks in Norway in 2011. 

Detectives found computer equipment containing thousands of images glorifying far-right terrorism attacks and Nazi ideology. 

Some of the images referred to Tarrant and Breivik as “saints” and one image was of pop star Taylor Swift, which had been photoshopped – the lenses of sunglasses she was wearing had been doctored to include swastikas.

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They found he possessed copies of Adolf Hitler’s work Mein Kampf, indecent images of children and extreme images that showed dead mutilated women being subjected to sexual acts. 

Imrie also possessed copies of the video that Tarrant had made of himself carrying out the shootings.

The 24-year-old was caught after officers in the Metropolitan Police tipped off Police Scotland counterparts. 

English officers had been scrutinising a group called ‘FashWave Artists’ on Telegram, an instant messaging app. 

The group hosted images and memes glorifying fascism but Imrie posted a series of messages in which he said he was planning to “burn down” a mosque. 

He also said he had written to Breivik. 

Detectives found CCTV footage of Imrie trying the door at the mosque before driving away. 

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A jury heard how armed police officers swooped on Imrie’s home at 2am and took him into custody. 

On Wednesday, Imrie, who denied any wrongdoing, was convicted on two charges of breaching the terrorism act, wilful fireraising, possessing child and ‘extreme’ indecent images and drink driving.

Moments after Ms Gillespie said the Crown were considering seeking a Serious Crime Prevention Order against Imrie, Lord Mulholland remanded the first offender in custody.

Imrie was told that the judge needed a background report before he could be sentenced.

Lord Mulholland also warned Imrie: “Be under no illusion – you have been convicted of very serious offences including gathering information about terrorism and encouraging terrorism, child pornography and extreme pornography. 

“You will not be surprised to know that you will be receiving a sentence of some length.”

Lord Mulholland spoke moments after jurors returned guilty verdicts to two terrorism charges. 

The first terrorism charge stated that Imrie made statements on Telegram and Facebook that encouraged acts of terrorism. 

The second charge he was convicted of stated that Imrie made a “record of information” that would be useful to somebody who was committing acts of terrorism. 

He was acquitted of a terrorism charge that stated he engaged in conduct in “preparation” of terrorism acts. 

Following his conviction, Pat Campbell, Police Scotland’s assistant chief constable for organised crime, counter terrorism and intelligence, said: “Sam Imrie was a socially-isolated-individual who displayed hateful intentions and the potential consequences of his actions do not bear thinking about. Police Scotland welcomes the outcome of the trial, which brings to a close what was an extremely complex investigation.

“I am grateful for the hard work and diligence of the officers who carried out the fast moving inquiry, as well as the support of our colleagues in the Metropolitan Police and the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service.

“It should be stressed that cases such as Imrie’s are rare in Scotland and our officers remain absolutely committed to working with our partners to protect our communities.

“I want to take this opportunity to appeal directly to the public that if you become aware of anyone, including a family member or friend, displaying extremist views, or are concerned that they could be radicalised or involved in extremist or terrorist activity, not to hesitate to contact the police.

“Advice is available at the ACT Early Counter Terrorism Policing website and anyone with concerns should contact Police Scotland or the confidential anti-terrorist hotline 0800 789 321.”


Train services cancelled and roads flooded as rain batters Scotland

An amber and yellow weather warning was issued by the Met Office for parts of the country on Wednesday.

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Flooding: Scotland hit by heavy rain following amber and yellow weather warnings.

Heavy rain has flooded roads and cancelled rail services in parts of south west Scotland.

An amber weather warning was issued for Dumfries and Galloway and the Scottish Borders, starting at 9pm on Wednesday and continuing until Thursday morning.

Around 60 to 80mm of rainfall is expected to build up, with up to 100mm falling in some areas. 

A separate yellow warning extends to South Lanarkshire and will be in place until 3pm on Thursday.

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The Met Office said there could be a “danger to life from fast-flowing or deep floodwater”.

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Flooding in Summerston, Glasgow

The amber alerts also warn of potential damage to homes and businesses from flooding, dangerous driving conditions and travel disruption.

Communities could be cut off by flooded roads and face power cuts, according to the Met Office.

ScotRail said a number of services had been affected by heavy rain, with flooding at Bishoppbriggs and Dalmuir closing two rail lines.

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Speed restrictions have been put in place on services due to surface water and a replacement bus service between Stirling and Alloa has been introduced.

Network Rail advised passengers to travel only if the journey is “absolutely necessary”.

Liam Sumpter, Network Rail Scotland route director, said: “Extreme rainfall can pose a serious risk to the railway, causing landslips or damaging our infrastructure and bridges.

“The safety of our passengers and colleagues is our main priority during periods of poor weather, and slowing services down and running fewer trains will help us manage these conditions for everyone.”

Meanwhile GlasGlow announced that its light show at Glasgow Botanic Gardens had to be cancelled last minute due to blocked drain at its entrance.

A post on the GlasGlow Facebook page said: “In the last 45 minutes the drain at the entrance to the Botanic Gardens has been overwhelmed and half a foot of water is blocking the entrance and road.

“The council have been alerted but unfortunately the entrance will be inaccessible to allow us to open safely. Inside the gardens, the show is fine and ready to go, the problem unfortunately is on the roads and out with our control.

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“We’re so sorry for the short notice however this situation has just arisen. If you’re a ticket holder for this evening a full refund will be processed and an email is on its way.”

The Scottish Environment Protection Agency tweeted: “A band of persistent and heavy rain in the south may lead to localised flooding from surface water and watercourses on Wednesday causing disruption to travel and flooding of low-lying land, especially in built up areas.”

The agency issued a flood warning for Ettrick Valley, while three flood alerts were in place in the Scottish Borders.


COP26 lodging crisis: Thousands of delegates without somewhere to stay

Thousands of delegates and even more activists have not found accommodation for the UN climate conference.

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There are no campsites or camping facilities in Glasgow and the council is not setting any up for COP26.

There is no backup plan to provide shelter to thousands of people who have not found a place to stay during the UN climate conference.

Those coming to Glasgow to take part in events around COP26 have been warned not to travel to the city without securing accommodation, while even official UN badge holders are still struggling to secure somewhere to stay.

The UN climate conference has been facing a lodging crisis after only 15,000 hotel rooms were secured in advance despite more than 25,000 delegates, 10,000 police officers, and thousands more campaigners and activists expected.

The official housing bureau for the event only pre-booked 5000 rooms within 20 miles of the Scottish Exhibition Centre where COP26 will take place, a third of what was available.

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There are fewer than 15,000 hotel rooms within 20 miles of the SEC where COP26 is taking place.
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Even though environmental organisations have urged Glasgow City Council to work with them to open up gym halls as mass emergency accommodation or set aside designated campsites, no backup has been put in place.

“Last-minute” agreements have brought two cruise ships to the Clyde to provide 3300 berths between them.

With 100,000 activists due to take part in a climate march, there is fear that some will be left outside in the cold November weather with nowhere to shelter.

There are no campsites or camping facilities in Glasgow and the council is not setting any up for COP26.

“That’s where our concern lies, there isn’t a backup plan.”

Dr Kat Jones, Stop Climate Chaos Scotland
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Stop Climate Chaos Scotland, a coalition of environmental organisations, said at least 2000 people are on the waiting list of the Homestay Network – a not-for-profit response to the accommodation crisis.

The network was set up to help civil society and community representatives from the Global South attend the climate talks, but it has found itself swamped with requests from official delegates.

Around 1000 Scots have opened their homes to visitors through the scheme but the organisation’s COP26 project manager said it has not been possible to absorb the numbers left without a place to stay.

“We have been in conversation with the council over a number of months about opening gym halls for emergency accommodation and setting up safe camping spaces where we can put portaloos, but they haven’t really helped us with that,” said doctor Kat Jones.

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Dr Kat Jones and Janice Fisher at the Scottish Affairs Committee.

“That’s where our concern lies, there isn’t a backup plan.”

MCI Group was appointed by the UK Government and the UN as the official housing bureau for COP26.

Janice Fisher, joint chair of Greater Glasgow Hoteliers Association, told a government committee that within two miles of the exhibition centre there are only 9750 hotel bedrooms and that within 20 miles this only increased to 14,399 – but MCI only secured a third of these.

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Ms Fisher said MCI had been asked to secure accommodation in other parts of the country as well to encourage a range of offers and pricing.

She said there were alternative ways of booking somewhere to stay including the Homestay Network, campsites outside the city and Airbnb.

An Airbnb host was banned from taking bookings during COP26 after attempting to hike a delegate’s room rate by £2000.

Dr Jones urged those who have not secured a place to sleep to take part in the conference in their local areas.

“There are all sorts of activities not centred around Glasgow, in London, many cities around England and a few others in Scotland,” she said.

“We’d encourage people to go to their local place rather than travel to Glasgow.”

A UK Government COP26 spokesperson said it had been working with MCI to make sure there was a balance of available lodging.

They said: “As hosts of COP26 it is of huge importance to the UK there is a wide range of fairly-priced accommodation options available which suit the budgets of delegates attending from around the world.”

A spokesperson for Glasgow City Council warned the weather in November in Glasgow can be very cold and changeable.

They said: “As we, and others, have been saying over the last few weeks, Glasgow will be extremely busy with delegates and visitors as COP26 gets underway.

“We would ask people wishing to stay in the city not to travel to Glasgow without first securing accommodation.”


‘Scotland should open consumption rooms without law change’

The campaigners were speaking before the Criminal Justice Committee at Holyrood.

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The facilities were first suggested after an HIV outbreak in Glasgow.

Scotland should open drug consumption rooms without waiting for a change in the law, campaigners have said.

The Scottish Government has long been in favour of the facilities, which would provide a safe area with medical supervision for people struggling with addiction to take drugs.

But the UK Government has stood against the idea, refusing to grant a waiver to the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 that would allow for the users and staff to be protected from prosecution.

The first facility was planned by Glasgow City Council but other local authorities have expressed an interest.

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Campaigner Peter Krykant ran a safe consumption room from a converted minivan in Glasgow (Jane Barlow/PA)
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Campaigner Peter Krykant, frustrated with the legal wrangle over the facilities, created his own in the form of a converted minivan that would go to different areas of the city.

Both Mr Krykant and Scottish Drugs Forum chief executive David Liddell OBE said the fact no prosecutions have resulted from the van shows the Scottish Government could give the go-ahead for the facilities.

“When I ran the safe consumption facility in Glasgow, there was no police intervention apart from a meaningless allegation of obstruction in the course of a search, so we could go ahead and open these facilities with a simple divert scheme into those facilities,” Mr Krykant told Holyrood’s Criminal Justice Committee on Wednesday.

“I already know Police Scotland officers were seeing people injecting in alleyways and diverting them to my ambulance to come and inject in a safe, supervised environment to reduce the risk of HIV.”

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Mr Liddell said: “As Peter has alluded to in terms of the drug consumption room he ran, there was no public interest in prosecuting Peter and no prosecution followed.

“It’s a ridiculous state of affairs that he could run a service like that and not be prosecuted but Greater Glasgow and Clyde health board that want to run a service like that can’t.

“We should proceed with drug consumption rooms in Scotland under the current legislation.

“If that requires a letter of comfort from the Lord Advocate – that is what we’ve previously advocated and pushed for.”

The Scottish Government has said as recently as this month that work continues to find a way to open the facilities.

In a meeting with UK policing minister Kit Malthouse, drugs minister Angela Constance said “we will leave no stone unturned in working to overcome existing legal barriers to implement safe consumption rooms in Scotland”.

The calls for the facilities began in the middle of the last decade following a major HIV outbreak in Glasgow, but these have now morphed into a response to the drugs death crisis, which figures show killed 1339 people in 2020.


Meet the climate activists fighting for change at COP26

Protests have been planned during the COP26 climate conference.

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With days to go until COP26 in Glasgow, climate activists have pledged to increase the pressure on world leaders.

Several days of protest have been planned over the next few weeks and police have warned of possible disruption.

But do public protests lead to political change? In this video report, STV News has been meeting those on the frontline of climate action to find out more.


Ministers not obliged to order ‘McMafia orders’, court hears

A judicial review is looking into why the Scottish Government did not try to place an unexplained wealth order on former US President Donald Trump.

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The order allows for an investigation into how a person or company earned money.

Ministers have a “discretion” rather than an obligation to order unexplained wealth orders to investigate individuals’ finances, a court review of a Scottish Government decision relating to Donald Trump has heard.

A judicial review at the Court of Session is considering the Scottish Government’s decision not to investigate the former US President ‘s finances in Scotland.

The US-based Avaaz Foundation petitioned Scotland’s highest court, the Court of Session, to grant a judicial review after ministers in Edinburgh declined to place an unexplained wealth order (UWO) – sometimes described as a “McMafia order” – on Trump.

The order allows for an investigation into how a person or company earned money.

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Ruth Crawford QC, representing Scottish ministers, said the challenge from the petitioners is rooted on there being a duty to seek a UWO.

However, referring to S396A of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (Poca), she said ministers did not have an obligation to do so.

She told the virtual hearing: “S396A1 provides that the Court of Session may, on an application made by the Scottish ministers, make an unexplained wealth order.”

She added: “The ministers have a discretion rather than an absolute obligation to make an application to the Court of Session.”

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Crawford said that UWOs have at the very least the “taint of criminality” and that one of the “limbs” of another section of the act is that the property has been funded by illegitimate sources of income.

She told the court: “The petitioners are not coming to this court saying we are unable to make a challenge.  Indeed, its challenge is firmly rooted on there being a duty to seek a UWO.

“Unexplained wealth orders are not just investigatory tools or as an aspect of good housekeeping, UWOs as my Lord is aware from S396a etc, give rise to a presumption, if they are not complied with, that presumption being that the property has been obtained through unlawful conduct and that the civil recovery order requirements have been met.”

Lord Sandison QC said he was being asked to decide whether Scottish minsters had acted unlawfully.

He said: “The actual declarator I’m being asked to make, F, is that by failing to seek an unexplained wealth order in relation to Mr Trump the Scottish ministers have failed in their duty and have therefore acted unlawfully.

“I don’t for the moment see that as me being asked to make any order equivalent to saying that had an application been made it would have been granted.

“The question is simply I’m being asked effectively to determine the lawfulness of the failure to make an application.”

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The judicial review, which began on Tuesday, previously heard that there is a dispute over whose responsibility it is to apply to a court for a UWO, particularly between the Lord Advocate – the head of Scotland’s prosecution service – and Scottish ministers.

The inquiry heard that the Scotland Act permits Scottish ministers, including the Lord Advocate, to exercise functions with a collective responsibility.

It also permits the Lord Advocate to exercise “retained functions”, to which collective responsibility would not attach.

Crawford said: “Parliament when passing the Poca in 2002, when passing the Extradition Act in 2003 and when passing the Criminal Finances Act in 2017, which sought to amend Poca by inter alia introducing unexplained wealth orders (UWOs), must be presumed to have known that the Lord Advocate exercises statutory functions as a member of the collective Scottish ministers entity and also that she exercises retained functions independently.

“That being so, in my submission, there is nothing unlawful about the fact that the Lord Advocate is the minister with portfolio responsibility for part eight of Poca, including seeking an unexplained wealth order.”

The hearing before Lord Sandison continues.


Health board sues super-hospital builder for another £18.2m

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde have lodged a fresh claim against Multiplex for defects that led to a public inquiry.

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Compensation: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde lodge fresh claim against Multiplex.

The company which built the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital is facing a new £18m compensation bill from the NHS for defects leading to a public inquiry into infection deaths.

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) has lodged a fresh claim against Multiplex, which oversaw the project to build the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital (QEUH) campus in Govan, seeking £18.2m.

The health board is already suing the construction giant for £73m in damages over a string of design flaws that it claims compromised “safe and effective healthcare” for patients at the QEUH and Royal Hospital for Children (RHC).

They include problems with the water system that led to it becoming contaminated.

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The board instructed lawyers to raise court proceedings “as a matter of urgency” in December 2019 amid mounting pressure over bacterial outbreaks amongst children that were linked to the water supply and ventilation systems.

It has emerged that court papers have been lodged for a separate claim related to the system that controls the temperature of the hospital.

Official documents show NHSGGC is seeking an additional £18.2m for problems with the chilled water system, which uses water instead of air to cool larger buildings.

The health board has been carrying out remedial works and the cost is being met by the Scottish Government ahead of the outcome of the legal case.

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One of the biggest projects has focused on improving ventilation in cancer wards at the RHC, where a ten-year-old girl had been treated for several weeks before she died

An inquiry concluded a water-linked infection was at least in part responsible for the death of Milly Main in 2017 after she was treated in ward 2A of the hospital.

The Crown Office is now investigating her death and also those of two other children, as well as a 73-year-old woman.

The families of children who developed airborne or water linked infections have been giving evidence to the Scottish Hospitals Inquiry, which is also examining problems with the Royal Hospital For Children And Young People in Edinburgh.

Earlier this week, a patient diagnosed with a rare cancer told the inquiry she experienced “frightening” fits that were linked to a hospital-acquired infection.

Molly Cuddihy was fitted with a line for chemotherapy treatment that later became infected and caused temperature spikes and fits.

Her body went into septic shock – a life-threatening condition that happens when blood pressure drops to a dangerously low level after an infection.

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Ms Cuddihy told the hearing how her doctor, Dr Sastry, had to liaise with a specialist in Edinburgh about her treatment because “no-one really knew and understood what this bug was”.

The health board is suing Multiplex Construction Europe Limited, performance guarantor BPY Holdings, project supervisors Capita Property and Infrastructure Ltd and lead consultant Currie and Brown UK.

The defenders have challenged the action, which was lodged on January 22, 2020, on the grounds that it may be “time barred” and a decision is awaited.

The board is also negotiating a settlement with Multiplex to replace the linings of the walls in the hospital atrium.

A spokesperson for NHSGGC said: “The chilled water system provides chilled water to air handling units, fan coil units, underfloor cooling pipe and chilled beams, which are located throughout the hospital for comfort cooling.

“The system has suffered leaks resulting in the need for repairs and replacements and a Court of Session summons was signeted on April 29 2021.

“This summons describes a claim for £18.2m and is in addition to the original court action.”

Multiplex was founded in Australia but is currently headquartered in London and specialises in high-rise buildings, stadiums and health and developments.

The company is overseeing a major project to extend the University of Glasgow campus.


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