Health and care staff asked to play part in vaccine trials

A total of 250 people to be recruited with participants to be given doses of two different vaccines.

Coronavirus: Trials for vaccine ongoing.
Coronavirus: Trials for vaccine ongoing.

Healthy frontline workers in Glasgow have been asked to play a part in Oxford University’s trials for a coronavirus vaccine.

The city’s health and care workers, who are between the age of 18 and 55, will be invited to take part in the research if they have not been infected with Covid-19.

Staff in Greater Glasgow and Clyde, from dental and care workers to those in intensive care units, emergency departments and care homes, have been encouraged to apply.

A total of 250 people will initially be recruited, with participants randomised to receive one or two doses of two different vaccines – one acting as a control for comparison.

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Screening and vaccination of participants will begin in the next two weeks.

Participants will be involved in the trial for the next 12 months and will be supported by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and the University of Glasgow researchers throughout its duration.

The University of Oxford’s phase one trial of healthy adult volunteers began in April and more than 1000 immunisations have been completed since.

Emma Thomson, a professor of Infectious Diseases at NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, said: “The University of Glasgow is extremely proud to be leading the phase II/III part of the University of Oxford COVID-19 vaccine trial in Glasgow in partnership with the NHS.

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“An effective vaccine would be an important step forward in controlling the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic on a global scale.

“We will be working closely with colleagues at Oxford University to determine if the ChAdOx1 vaccine protects those who receive it from infection in a phase III clinical trial, following successful smaller phase I and II trials in Oxford.

“The vaccine will be tested initially in frontline healthcare staff in order to test the effectiveness and safety of immunisation in an at-risk group.

“Although we are at still at a very early stage, we remain hopeful that the information we gather will contribute to international efforts to secure a vaccine to protect those most vulnerable to infection.”

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