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Glasgow Art School fire investigation moves to next stage

The fire service will be given access to park of the Mackintosh building later this month.

Glasgow: The School of Art went up in flames.
Glasgow: The School of Art went up in flames.

Major work to give the fire service access to the blaze-hit Glasgow School of Art’s Mackintosh building will begin this month.

Investigations into the fire are continuing almost two years after the devastating blaze.

A crane will arrive around February 24 and work will be concentrated at the west end of the building, with fire-damaged material being removed from the site.

The work is expected to take around six months and Renfrew Street will remain closed between Dalhousie Street and Scott Street during that time.

The world-renowned building, designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, was extensively damaged when a fire broke out late on June 15, 2018 as it neared the end of a £35m restoration project following a previous fire in May 2014.

Blaze: The fire ripped through the building. SNS Group

In a statement, Glasgow School of Art said: “The major work required to facilitate access to the further areas of the Mackintosh building requested by the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service for their ongoing investigations will begin on February 24.

“Given the extent of the requested access – along the whole of the south side of the building from Dalhousie Street to beyond the museum – around 24 weeks of activity is forecast.”

The work is planned to take place on weekdays from 8am to 4.30pm, with members of the GSA Mackintosh building team and the SFRS on site. Work may take place on Saturdays at short notice.

The statement added: “The Glasgow School of Art would like to thank local residents, students and staff for their continued understanding as we undertake the work which is necessary for the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service to continue their ongoing investigative work.”

The art school said there will be no changes to the existing extent of the building site during the works, but there will be more vehicles coming and going.

Ross Haggart, SFRS director of prevention and protection, said: “This excavation forms one strand of the overall investigation which remains ongoing.”


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