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Holmwood House reopens to public after renovation

The 160-year-old house has reopened to the public after three months of renovation work.

Holmwood House: The 160-year-old building has reopened to the public. <strong>National Trust for Scotland</strong>
Holmwood House: The 160-year-old building has reopened to the public. National Trust for Scotland

A 160-year-old house has reopened to the public after three months of renovation work to recreate the property’s original decoration.

Holmwood House by Scottish architect Alexander “Greek” Thomson was created for paper magnate James Couper and completed in 1858.

The National Trust for Scotland took ownership of the Glasgow house in 1994 and uncovered original decorations surviving under layers of wallpaper and paint.

Visitors will now be able to see 19th century recreations of the interior design schemes in the main entrance hall and interior stairway.

Decoration: It is hoped that more rooms will be returned to their original schemes. National Trust for Scotland

Karen Cornfield, Holmwood House operations manager, said: “We are delighted to share our progress in bringing Holmwood back to its former glory with our visitors and members, many of whom have been loyal supporters of this project.”

The wallpaper was scraped back to reveal “windows” to the original schemes, with work also based off photographs of other Thomson interiors, including his own home.

It is hoped more rooms will be returned to their original schemes and an ongoing fundraising campaign hopes to get £120,000 to do so.

Historic: The house was designed by Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson. National Trust for Scotland

Emma Inglis, National Trust for Scotland curator, said: “The transformation of the hall and stair is amazing.

“We always knew Thomson’s scheme for this area was beautiful, if the paint scrapes were to be believed, but now that it has been recreated throughout the space it reinforces just how good Thomson really was.

“Visitors will not see anything else like it in Scotland.”


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