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Yule revels in Birmingham games medal 12 years on from coma

Micky Yule won Commonwealth bronze after twice missing out in 2014 and 2018.

Micky Yule ‘refused to leave’ without Commonwealth Games medal 12 years after emerging from coma in Birmingham Team Scotland
Micky Yule lost both his legs stepping on an improvised explosive device (IED).

Para-powerlifter Micky Yule insisted there was no way he was leaving Birmingham without a medal after his life was saved in the city 12 years ago. 

After narrowly missing out in Glasgow 2014 and Gold Coast 2018, the former Royal engineer, who lost both his legs stepping on an improvised explosive device (IED) in Afghanistan, finally clinched Commonwealth bronze last night.

“It was incredible. I’m still trying to work out exactly what actually happened,” he told STV News.

“To finally get that bronze medal just means the world to me.

“Two fourth places – it’s the highs and lows of sport and I’m certainly feeling the high at the moment. It’s certainly a better feeling than coming fourth, I know that.

Yule's daughter Tilly was there to roar her dad to Commonwealth Games bronze. (Image: Craig Watson/Team Scotland)
Yule’s daughter Tilly was there to roar her dad to Commonwealth Games bronze. (Image: Craig Watson/Team Scotland)

Yule, who was also one of Scotland’s flagbearers, underwent more than 40 operations after losing his legs and is grateful to the staff at Birmingham’s Queen Elizabeth hospital for saving his life.

“It is full circle. I flew in, with a lot of the guys that were injured, from Afghanistan, basically in a coma, just about dead,” he said.

“I’ve used sport to bring my life back and give me a purpose and a goal and I’ve achieved some great stuff.

“But I’ve achieved them in Tokyo in front of 60 people or I’ve done it in other countries where I’ve never had my family or my friends or this support.

“To bring it back to Birmingham, the place where it all started from my injury, and actually win that medal that I’ve been dreaming about for years, it makes it extra special. I’ve certainly loved the people of Birmingham. 

“They’ve saved my live. All the doctors and nurses at that hospital. So, if that’s the chapter ending. we’ll see where the next one goes.”

Yule admitted it was extra special to have his six-year-old daughter, Tilly, watching on.

“It was amazing to have my little girl there. I wasn’t not going to medal if she was there, that’s the rule! I’m not going to let her down,” he said.

“She’s only six. I can’t have her first memory as me missing a medal. She can come to all the big events. I won’t miss it if she’s there.”