Strawberry Moon will be visible in Scotland tonight

Rare lunar spectacle, also known as a penumbral eclipse, coincides with summer solstice once every 20 years.

Strawberry Moon will be visible in Scotland tonight Getty

A rare lunar spectacle will occur in Scotland tonight when a Strawberry Moon lights up the country’s skies.

The phenomenon, also known as a penumbral eclipse, occurs when the earth, sun and moon are all aligned.

This means the earth blocks the sun’s light from reaching the moon, casting a shadow over it.

The Strawberry Moon will be visible in Scotland at 8.12pm this evening.

The moon gets its name from the fact it appears in June every year, the same month as the summer solstice.

Nasa says when the sun appears highest in the sky near the summer solstice, the full moon opposite the sun generally appears lowest in the sky.

For Europe’s higher latitudes, the full moon nearest the summer solstice shines through more atmosphere than at other times of the year, making it more likely to have a reddish colour

A full moon occurs every 29.5 days and is when Earth is directly aligned between the sun and the moon – which is completely illuminated by the sun’s rays.