Scotland records 30 deaths and 5529 new cases of Covid-19

Official statistics published on Friday showed that there were 1037 people in hospital with the virus.

Scotland records 30 deaths and 5529 new cases of Covid-19 iStock

Scotland has recorded 30 deaths and 5529 new cases of coronavirus in the last 24 hours.

Official statistics published on Friday showed that there were 1037 people in hospital with the virus, with 87 people in intensive care.

It comes after 26 deaths were recorded in Thursday’s statistics, and 30 deaths were recorded on Wednesday.

Meanwhile, data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates that around one in 45 people had Covid-19 in the week to September 11.

It is the the second week in a row it has been at the highest level since estimates began for Scotland in last October.

Concerns have also been raised over rising case numbers in care homes, with 206 positive cases confirmed amongst residents in Scottish care homes between September 6 and September 12.

The CEO of Scottish Care, Donald Macaskill, earlier warned of the challenge facing the sector.

“These are exceptionally challenging times for care homes in Scotland,” he wrote on Twitter.

“We have the highest number of Covid outbreaks since Feb and sadly the highest number of deaths since March.

“Please do all you can to support your local care home residents and workforce.”

On Tuesday, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon confirmed that children in Scotland aged between 12 and 15 will be able to get a vaccine from Monday.

Drop-in clinics will be open next week for those who have read the information provided regarding vaccination.

In the following week, letters will be sent to all 12 to 15-year-olds inviting them to an appointment at a drop-in centre or vaccination clinic.

The First Minister also announced that from Monday, booster jabs will be offered to all adults over 50 in Scotland.

The booster will also be offered to frontline health and care workers and to younger adults with certain health conditions that put them at higher risk and to household contacts of people with suppressed immune systems.

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