Refugee support groups in Scotland to share £2.8m cash boost

A total of 56 projects have been given cash to help new Scots settle in to their adopted communities.

Refugee support groups in Scotland to share £2.8m cash boost PA Media

Groups working to support refugees in Scotland will share £2.8m in a new grant scheme.

A total of 56 projects have been given cash to help new Scots settle in to their adopted communities.

The money is being used to promote training and employment, health, education and social and cultural connections.

Among the grants awarded are:

– £104,615 for employment and training support for refugees in the West of Scotland.

– £72,930 to help Arabic speakers in Dundee, Fife and Clackmannanshire access certification to work in the Scottish construction industry.

– £114,987 to improve mental health and reduce loneliness and social isolation of refugees and separated children in Edinburgh.

– £23,075 for English language classes in Midlothian helping to prepare for the workplace.

This project is part funded by the EU Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund and is part of the New Scots Refugee Integration Delivery Project.

It is led by the Scottish Government in partnership with Scottish local authorities’ umbrella body Cosla, the Scottish Refugee Council and the University of Glasgow.

Social justice secretary, Shona Robison, said: “We are committed to supporting the integration of asylum seekers into our communities from day one, not just when leave to remain has been granted.

“The funding and development of these projects will support our aim to have cohesive, connected and multi-cultural communities where people can access services and be supported into employment and education.

“Scotland has a long history of welcoming asylum seekers and refugees from all over the world. In re-building their lives they help make the country stronger, more compassionate and more successful for everyone.”

Scottish Refugee Council CEO, Sabir Zazai, said the funding would allow groups to “strengthen and deepen” their work with people seeking safety in Scotland.

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