Nearly every adult in Scotland 'has Covid antibodies'

The Office for National Statistics said 99% of Scots had the infection-fighting molecules - more than in England and Wales.

Nearly every adult in Scotland has Covid-19 antibodies, Office for National Statistics estimates say iStock
The measurement shows the impact of coronavirus infections and the vaccine programme.

Nearly every adult in Scotland would have tested positive for Covid-19 antibodies, official estimates have found.

At the end of March, 99% of those over 15 years old are estimated to have developed the infection-fighting molecules, the Office for National Statistics said.

This is higher than in both England and Wales.

The measurement shows the impact of coronavirus infections and the vaccine programme.

It takes between two and three weeks after infection or vaccination for the body to make enough antibodies to fight the infection.

Antibodies can help prevent individuals from getting the same infection again. Once infected or vaccinated, antibodies remain in the blood at low levels and can decline over time.

In the week beginning March 28, 2022, the percentage of the population that were estimated to have antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 was 98.9% in England, 98.8% in Wales, 99.2% in Northern Ireland, and 99% in Scotland.

Across the UK, the percentages for children ranged from 95.3% to 97.6% for those aged 12 to 15 years old and from 83.7% to 85.9% for those aged eight to 11 years old.

In Scotland, the percentage of people testing positive for Covid-19 has continued to decrease in the week ending April 9.

An estimated one in 17 people are thought to have had the virus as the final legal restrictions designed to reduce the spread were dropped on Easter Monday.