Lip fillers and Botox face tighter restrictions following consultation

There have been calls for non-surgical cosmetic procedures to be conducted by regulated healthcare professionals.

Lip fillers and Botox face tighter restrictions after Scottish Government consultation to regulate procedures iStock
Consultation: There is overwhelming support for further regulation of procedures in Scotland.

Tighter regulations on who can administer lip and face fillers are to be considered following a consultation for non-surgical cosmetic procedures which pierce or penetrate the skin.

The consultation found that there was overwhelming support for further regulation of non-surgical cosmetic procedures, such as dermal fillers.

Most of the respondents felt that non-surgical cosmetic procedures should be conducted by trained, qualified and regulated healthcare professionals.

Fillers can be injected into the face, either to plump the lips or improve the appearance of wrinkles.

Measures to enhance public safety around the procedures will now be considered by the Scottish Government.

It means that restrictions could come into place around who can administer dermal fillers, with anyone administering them required to meet rigorous hygiene and clinical standards.

The Scottish Government will also scope other procedures to consider the need for further regulation.

Health secretary Humza Yousaf said: “Our aim is to ensure that all non-surgical cosmetic procedures carried out in Scotland are delivered from hygienic premises by appropriately trained practitioners, applying recognised standards and using legitimate products.

“The consultation showed that 98% of respondents agreed that further regulation of non-surgical cosmetic procedures was needed. Most of the respondents felt that non-surgical cosmetic procedures should be conducted by trained, qualified and regulated healthcare professionals.

“If things go wrong when dermal fillers are administered, the complications can often cause long term damage that can only be reversed or limited by the urgent administration of specific prescription-only medication. We want to avoid those situations.”

The Scottish Government will now consider legislation to restrict who can administer dermal fillers, with the aim of protecting public safety. This will include further stakeholder engagement and consultation. 

Secondary legislation will also be considered to bring pharmacists who provide services outside of NHS contracts under the regulation of HIS by adding them to the list of service providers included in the definition of an independent clinic in section 10F of the National Health Service (Scotland) Act 1978.  

The public consultation also overwhelmingly supported this proposal.