Green recovery summit to explore future after pandemic

Industry and scientific leaders will discuss how Scotland can build a sustainable recovery from coronavirus.

An environmental summit featuring 50 industry and scientific leaders will look at how Scotland can build a sustainable recovery from the coronavirus outbreak.

The online Green Recovery Summit is being hosted by the Royal Scottish Geographical Society (RSGS) and aims to influence the Scottish Government’s strategy for economic recovery after the pandemic.

Delegates including transport bosses, industrial leaders and academics are expected to discuss and prioritise considerations such as financing a green recovery and sustainable procurement.

They will then make recommendations to the Scottish Government.

Speaking ahead of Monday’s conference, RSGS chief executive Mike Robinson said: “The coronavirus pandemic has transformed our societies both nationally and globally, and we have borrowed a huge amount of money to get us through this crisis.

“It is vital we use this coming period to build and shape our continuing emergence from this crisis in a way that ensures we best protect ourselves from any future ones.

“Climate change has to be the most profound of these, and it would be a huge missed opportunity not to use this forced change as a springboard for a transformation to a more sustainable society.

“The upcoming Green Recovery Summit is a perfect platform to propose positive changes and present solutions.”

Iain Gulland, chief executive of event sponsor Zero Waste Scotland, said: “We are all aware that swift, decisive action is needed to avoid deepening the climate emergency we find ourselves in.

“Scotland has long been recognised as a leading nation on the circular economy and as we emerge from the coronavirus pandemic we have an unprecedented opportunity to reaffirm our commitment to a more sustainable future.

“The circular economy has huge potential for Scotland with economic opportunities worth up to £3bn estimated before coronavirus impacted the economy, as well as significant benefits for our environment.

“As we set out key next steps that will shape how we live and work for years to come, it’s vital that we ensure progress towards a greener, more resilient economy is right at the heart of our plans.” 

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