Duck put down and seal left suffering tangled in 'death trap' fishing wire

Scottish SPCA rescue staff were called out to two incidents involving animals tangled up in fishing wire over the weekend.

Duck put down and seal left suffering for weeks after becoming tangled in ‘death trap’ fishing wire SSPCA

A duck had to be put down and a young seal was left suffering for weeks after becoming tangled in “death trap” fishing wire.

Scottish SPCA staff were called out to two incidents in which animals were severely injured after becoming tangled up in fishing wire.

On Saturday afternoon, animal rescue officer Heather Shaw was called out to an injured duck on a path at Hillend reservoir in North Lanarkshire.

The officer found the young female duck unable to walk due to her leg being wrapped up in fishing line.

“She was clearly in a lot of pain lying on her belly and the leg looked mangled with the tight wire and was extremely swollen,” Ms Shaw said.

The duck was taken to the vet where it was discovered that the line had cut the animal to the bone, and had to be put down due to her injuries.

The charity is urging anyone fishing across Scotland to ensure their equipment is fully cleared away adding that it could save an animal’s life.

“We’re urging anyone fishing in this area, or anywhere in Scotland, to show some consideration and clear away every last piece of fishing equipment. This really could save an animal’s life.”

This was the first of two fishing line incidents at the weekend, with animal rescue officer Lucy Rattray called out to an injured grey seal on Beach Road, Johnshaven in Montrose, on Sunday.

The young female seal was found with the line “firmly” stuck around her neck, and was bleeding.

Warning: Distressing image

Young female seal was found with the line SSPCA

The officer said it took time to help the seal, adding that she could have been suffering with the wound for “at least three weeks”.

The seal, now named Ariel, was transported to the SSPCA wildlife centre later that evening for treatment.

“She was given painkillers and the fishing line was detached from her neck,” Ms Rattray said.

The wound was fully cleaned and dead tissue was removed, however, the officer said it could take months for it to fully heal.

“Although the vast majority of anglers are very responsible and take care to clear away their equipment after they’ve used it, there is a minority of people who fish and don’t respect the environment and the wildlife that inhabits it,” Ms Rattray said.

Anyone who is concerned about an animal can contact the charity’s confidential animal helpline on 03000 999 999.

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