Almost 1700 domestic abuse crimes recorded under new Act

Introduced in April 2019, the Domestic Abuse (Scotland) Act criminalises coercive and controlling behaviours.

Almost 1700 domestic abuse crimes recorded under new Act Pixabay
Domestic abuse: The new act criminalises coercive and controlling behaviours.

Almost 1700 offences were recorded under the new Domestic Abuse Act in the last year.

Introduced in April 2019, the Domestic Abuse (Scotland) Act (DASA) criminalised coercive and controlling behaviours used by domestic abusers.

The law created a single offence which covers a full range of behaviours, including physical, psychological, financial or sexual abuse.

The figures from Police Scotland’s quarter four results showed that 1681 crimes under the DASA were recorded during the year, with 1158 detected.

Deputy chief constable Fiona Taylor has urged people to reach out if they feel they are in an abusive relationship, especially during lockdown.

DCC Taylor said: “Crimes recorded under the new domestic abuse legislation underline the fact that, sadly, private spaces are not safe places for everyone.

“For some people, the stay at home guidance may expose them to a greater risk of abuse, harm and neglect.

“We are seeking to be proactive when it comes to people we know have a history of committing domestic violence or domestic abuse, and we also want to ensure that support is given to people who may have been victims in the past, and we are encouraging people and neighbours to look out for each other.

“I want to reiterate that Police Scotland remains here to help and support our fellow citizens to keep them safe in all aspects of their lives.

“If you need police assistance, if you need our support or intervention, or if you have concerns about someone else, contact us and we will help.”

The report also highlights that group one crimes of violence had increased 16.2% (1297) year-on-year.

Cyber crimes have also increased over the last year, including the disclosure of, or threat of disclosure of, intimate images, as well as online grooming and cyber-related fraud.

The period covered by the report only includes a small number of days during which emergency Covid-19 social distancing measures were in place.