Sturgeon’s appearance at Salmond inquiry postponed

First Minister will no longer appear before Scottish Parliament inquiry next Tuesday.

Sturgeon will not give evidence to Holyrood inquiry next week. Russell Cheyne - WPA/Pool via Getty Images
Sturgeon will not give evidence to Holyrood inquiry next week.

Nicola Sturgeon’s appearance at an inquiry investigating the Scottish Government’s handling of harassment complaints against Alex Salmond has been postponed.

The First Minister had been due to appear in front of the Scottish Parliament inquiry next Tuesday.

However, a court ruling on Thursday may pave the way for Salmond to eventually make an appearance after he earlier pulled out following a committee decision to not publish some of his evidence.

If he does agree to make an appearance, that hearing would take place before Sturgeon is invited to answer questions.

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A spokesperson for the Scottish Parliament said: “At its meeting today, the committee was united in its desire to complete this inquiry in an open and transparent way, and to publish its report and recommendations next month.

“Given the recent impact of the recent court judgement is not known, the committee has agreed that it must have the time to reflect on the impact of its work once the full written judgement is published early next week.

“As a result, the committee has agreed that the First Minster’s evidence should be postponed until the full impact of that judgement is considered.  

“It is important for the committee to hear from Mr Salmond and the committee has always been clear that the First Minister should be the last witness to appear before the inquiry.” 

Salmond was due to give evidence to the committee investigating the botched handling of complaints against him on Tuesday, but he refused to do so after it declined to publish evidence he submitted.

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The committee cited legal concerns over the identity of complainers in Salmond’s criminal trial last year, where he was cleared of 13 charges at the High Court in Edinburgh.

However, a judge on Thursday amended a court order which prevents the publication of anything that may identify the accusers, as well as clarifying its scope.

The Spectator magazine – which published the evidence submission that the committee declined to – applied to the court to vary the terms of the order.

Ronald Clancy QC, acting for the magazine, argued the order is having a “significant influence” on how the committee is operating.

Following a meeting of the committee on Friday, MSPs decided to postpone Sturgeon’s appearance scheduled for next Tuesday until the ramifications of the court order amendment are known.

Judge Lady Dorrian’s judgement will be published early next week.

The committee was set up after Salmond received a £512,000 payout following the Court of Session civil ruling that the Scottish Government’s handling of the complaints against the former First Minister was “unlawful” and “tainted by apparent bias”.

Lennon resigns as Celtic manager with club 18 points adrift

Lennon's departure comes after 1-0 defeat to bottom-placed Ross County on Sunday.

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Lennon has left the club after a troubled season.

Neil Lennon has quit as Celtic manager with immediate effect.

Lennon’s departure comes after a 1-0 away defeat to Ross County that continues a troubled season for a team that has won four consecutive domestic trebles.

The Northern Irishman leaves with the team 18 points behind Rangers in the Premiership. His assistant John Kennedy will take over as interim manager.

Lennon, 49, has been a player, coach and manager (over two spells) for the vast majority of the past two decades but has been under pressure for months as season full of promise has become a struggle.

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After nine successive league titles, Celtic were chasing a Scottish record ten in a row but instead a resurgent Rangers are closing in on the trophy. Lennon has also seen his side crash out of Europe and end a long run of domestic cup dominance.

Lennon said: “We have experienced a difficult season due to so many factors and, of course, it is very frustrating and disappointing that we have not been able to hit the same heights as we did previously.

“I have worked as hard as ever to try and turn things around, but unfortunately we have not managed to get the kind of run going that we have needed.

“I have always given my best to the club and have been proud to deliver silverware to the Celtic supporters. The club will always be part of me. I will always be a Celtic supporter myself and I will always want the best for Celtic.

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“I would like to thank so many people at the club who have given me so much and I would also like to thank my family for their love and support. I wish the Celtic supporters, players, staff and directors nothing but success for the future.”

Lennon, a successful player with the club from 2000 to 2007, first managed Celtic in 2010, winning the first three league titles of their current run, as well as two Scottish Cup victories.

Following the abrupt departure of Brendan Rodgers from Celtic Park in February 2019, he returned to the club to take charge until the end of the season. He guided the team to the title and, after winning the Scottish Cup for the team to complete a third domestic treble he was offered the job on a permanent basis.

Last season the Northern Irishman continued the run of silverware, sealing a record-equalling ninth consecutive league title and winning the League Cup. He also lead his side out at the delayed Scottish Cup final in December, where they beat Hearts to complete a historic ‘quadruple treble’.

Though successful domestically before this season, Lennon’s record in Europe in his second spell was more troubled. A 5-4 aggregate defeat to CFR Cluj ended Champions League involvement in the third qualifying round last season. The consolation place of a Europa League place was taken and Celtic topped their group but were defeated by Copenhagen in the last 32.

This season, Champions League qualification saw the club knocked out by Ferencvaros in the second round. The Europa League brought more misery with a home defeat to Milan and an away draw with Lille followed by humiliating back-to-back 4-1 defeats to Sparta Prague.

Following the second of those losses, Lennon had insisted that he enjoyed the backing of the Celtic hierarchy and was determined to fight on.

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A League Cup exit to Ross County brought demonstrations at Celtic Park from angry fans and a 4-1 defeat to Milan worsened the situation.

The manager continued to argue that he should be given the chance to turn results around but conceded that his trophy-laden past record may not count for much given recent setbacks.

However, Lennon did receive clear and public backing from the club’s board in early December when they said they were supportive. However, the statement acknowledged results and said that a review would take place “in the new year”.

A run of positive results came to an end with defeat to Rangers at Ibrox on January 2, though Celtic’s performance was much improved on previous encounters.

However, following the defeat the club left for Dubai for a training camp.

Lennon, his assistant John Kennedy, another member of staff and 13 players at the club had to isolate following the trip after defender Christopher Jullien tested positive for coronavirus.

A second Celtic player was confirmed as having the virus during a media conference where Lennon had claimed critics of the trip were “hypocrites”, had claimed other clubs were not following covid protocols, and claimed some in the media had misrepresented the trip.

While Lennon and key players isolated, Celtic drew two games, ceding further ground in the Premiership.

On his return to the dugout, he saw the team draw 2-2 at Livingston and afterwards insisted that he would not quit, saying he had “put too much into it” and that “It’s my life”.

Results continued to be mixed. A 0-0 draw at Almondvale followed, and the team then beat Hamilton 2-0 before defeat to St Mirren.

Five wins in a row then saw Lennon optimistic that the team had found their stride but the defeat in Dingwall in Sunday left him unable to explain another defensive lapse but insisting he was the man to solve the problems and could mastermind a summer rebuild.

‘He fought so hard’

Celtic chief executive Peter Lawwell said: “I would like to pay tribute to Neil for all he has done for the club in his second spell, delivering our eighth and ninth successive league titles, the quadruple treble and winning the last five available domestic trophies.

“Neil has always been and will always be a true Celtic man and someone I will always hold in the highest regard.   

“I have watched Neil fight many battles over many years, on and off the field, with a courage and tenacity few could match. Even this season, he has fought so hard and worked tirelessly to turn things around.

“While this season has not progressed as we would have liked, it cannot diminish the character or integrity of a man who has given the club so much.

“Personally, it is a sad day for me to see Neil leave the club. Neil is a man of quality and decency, he is someone who will always be part of the fabric of Celtic and someone who will always be welcomed at Celtic Park.

“On behalf of everyone at the club, and personally, I would like to thank Neil for his work as our manager and I wish him and his family good health and continued success in everything they do.”

Celtic’s biggest shareholder Dermot Desmond said: “Neil is a Celtic legend both as a player and manager. He has given so much to the Club, and with his success over the last number of years – including winning a Treble in his own right – he will be very difficult to replace.

“We thank Neil sincerely for all he has done for the club and we wish him every success going forward.”

Neil Lennon: ‘Celtic will always be a part of me’

Lennon has quit Celtic with the club 18 points behind Rangers in the league.

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Lennon won five trophies during his second spell as Celtic manager.

Neil Lennon has insisted he did everything possible to turn Celtic’s season around.

He has resigned as manager with the club 18 points adrift in the Premiership.

Celtic had been chasing a historic tenth consecutive league title, but have struggled to find consistent form all season.

Lennon won five trophies in his second spell as Celtic manager after taking over from Brendan Rodgers in February 2019.

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The Northern Irishman said he had “worked as hard as ever” to improve the club’s fortunes.

He said: “We have experienced a difficult season due to so many factors and, of course, it is very frustrating and disappointing that we have not been able to hit the same heights as we did previously.

“I have worked as hard as ever to try and turn things around, but unfortunately we have not managed to get the kind of run going that we have needed.

“I have always given my best to the club and have been proud to deliver silverware to the Celtic supporters. The club will always be part of me. I will always be a Celtic supporter myself and I will always want the best for Celtic.

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“I would like to thank so many people at the club who have given me so much and I would also like to thank my family for their love and support. I wish the Celtic supporters, players, staff and directors nothing but success for the future.”


At-a-glance: How Scotland plans to ease out of lockdown

Scotland will return to a regional levels system from the last week of April if virus suppression continues.

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Scotland will return to a regional levels system from the last week in April if virus suppression continues, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has said.

There will be a gradual easing within level four areas from now until April 26, with a minimum three week gap between each relaxation of restrictions.

Sturgeon said the Scottish Government hopes to remove the stay at home requirement by April 5 and then, at least three weeks later, the country will return to geographically variable levels.

Mainland Scotland and some islands have been under level four restrictions – carrying stay at home guidance – since January 5.

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Orkney, Shetland and islands in the Highland and Argyll and Bute local authority areas – with the exception of Skye – are currently under level three restrictions.

The First Minister told MSPs the five-level system, separated by council areas, will return and she hopes those in level four will be able to drop down to level three, which would see sectors such as non-essential retail reopen.

The Scottish Government’s framework on the planned easing of restrictions is available here and the indicative dates can be viewed at a glance below.

All of the indicative dates are subject to change in accordance with the prevalence of the virus and the progress of the vaccination programme.

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FEBRUARY 22 TO MARCH 15:

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SCHOOLS: Primaries one, two and three returned to class full-time on Monday. Nursery children also went back on that date, along with some senior pupils facing assessments in S4-S6 on a part-time basis.

CARE HOMES: Regular visiting will resume in Scottish care homes from early March, with residents allowed to have two designated visitors each. Each designated visitor will be able to see their relative once a week.

MARCH 15 TO APRIL 5:

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SCHOOLS: Second phase of school reopening will begin from Monday, March 15. Discussion is ongoing but this phase is expected to include the remaining primary school years (P4-P7) and more secondary school pupils on a part-time ‘blended learning’ basis.

UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES: Phased return of a further small number of priority students for in-person learning.

SPORT: Non-contact outdoor group sports for 12-17-year-olds will resume, subject to sport-specific guidance.

SOCIALISING: Rules eased to allow outdoor meetings of four people from two households.

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APRIL 5 TO APRIL 26:

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STAY AT HOME: The stay at home restriction is scheduled to be lifted on April 5 (Easter Monday).

SCHOOLS: Third and final phase of schools reopening, which will see all pupils back in the classroom if they haven’t already returned. Easter holidays start around early April and the exact dates vary by local authority.

COMMUNAL WORSHIP: Places of worship will reopen with numbers restricted to 20.

SOCIALISING: A further extension to outdoor mixing with six people from two households allowed to meet together.

RETAIL: Essential retailers list expanded and click-and-collect services resume for non-essential retail.

APRIL 26: RETURN TO REGIONAL LEVELS SYSTEM

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ECONOMY: The reopening of Scotland’s economy – including non-essential shops, bars, restaurants, gyms and hairdressers – will get underway from Monday, April 26.

LEVELS – All of mainland Scotland and island areas in level four scheduled to move down to level three. The First Minister said the five-level system may not be exactly the same as the framework that was in place last year – those restrictions can be viewed here.

‘Vital first step’ as Long Covid care gets £760,000

It is estimated as many as 10% of people who have had the virus are now living with long Covid in Scotland.

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Funding announced to improve care for people with long Covid.

A £760,000 joint funding package has been announced to improve care for people with long Covid.

Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland (CHSS), which is providing £300,000 of the funds, said the investment is a “vital first step” towards providing better all-round care for people suffering the debilitating long-term effects of the virus.

Long Covid is a complex condition and sufferers experience a variety of symptoms ranging from breathlessness, chronic fatigue and anxiety to stress.

It is estimated as many as 10% of people who have had the virus are now living with long Covid in Scotland.

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It has been described by some as the “pandemic behind the pandemic”.

The funding will boost capacity for CHSS support services and over the coming months it will also lead to the creation of a co-ordinated nationwide “care pathway” between the NHS, GPs and the charity.

Jane-Claire Judson, CHSS chief executive, said: “No-one should be left to struggle with long Covid alone. This joint funding package with the Scottish Government is a vital first step in providing better all-round care for people suffering the debilitating long-term effects of this devastating virus.

“There are a number of steps still to take to get to a fully integrated, nationwide service for long Covid, but this funding will make sure that people can now get better support.

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“Over the coming months we will be working with people living with long Covid, the NHS and the Scottish Government to make sure that the process of accessing the full range of help and support gets easier.

“Right now, we’re encouraging people affected to call our long Covid advice line on 0808 801 0899 for help. Please do not suffer alone.”

The charity set up the advice line to help people with long Covid manage feelings of anxiety, breathlessness, fatigue and stress.

CHSS said its services will become a routine part of the NHS referral system over the coming months, meaning GPs and health professionals will automatically be able to refer patients for help.

The Scottish Government is contributing £460,000.

Health secretary Jeane Freeman said: “We know that many people are suffering from the effects of the virus on both their physical and mental health.

‘The impact of this virus affects your whole life. I lost the job that I loved because I wasn’t well enough to continue, I lost my health and it really affects you mentally.’

Dr Amy Small, a GP who has been living with long Covid

“We are committed to ensuring they have nationwide and co-ordinated care that meets their needs. I’m pleased that working with Chest, Heart & Stroke we are able to benefit from their experience and with the financial support we’ve provided, work to help provide the right care to those affected.

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“There is still much to learn and a great deal to be done, but this Government, clinicians, specialist healthcare professionals and important organisations like Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland are working hard to make sure people can access the services currently available and that we make the improvements needed as quickly as possible.”

Dr Amy Small, a GP who has been living with long Covid, said: “Having someone to help you live day-to-day with long Covid is so important.

“The impact of this virus affects your whole life. I lost the job that I loved because I wasn’t well enough to continue, I lost my health and it really affects you mentally.

“There’s lots that we still need to fix, but it’s great to see that everyone is coming together to build the service that people with long Covid need and want.”

Public warned not to approach inmate missing from prison

Michael Anthony Broomfield, an inmate at HMP Castle Huntly in Dundee, was reported missing on Monday.

SPS via Scottish Prison Service / Police Scotland
Michael Anthony Broomfield, an inmate, went missing from HMP Castle Huntly, Dundee.

Members of the public have be warned not to approach an inmate missing from a Scottish prison.

Tayside police appealed for information after Michael Anthony Broomfield was reported missing from HMP Castle Huntly in Dundee on Monday, February 22, at 8pm.

Castle Huntly is Scotland’s only open prison, holding up to 285 adult male offenders.

The 34-year-old could be in North East England, where police said he had connections including in Spennymoor, Durham and Newcastle.

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He is described as 6ft 1in, of a medium build, with medium length dark brown hair and a beard.

He was last seen wearing a black and grey bobble hat, black and grey hooded top and blue jogging bottoms.

Police Scotland warned the public not to approach Broomfield if seen and instead to contact officers on 101, quoting incident number 3295 of Monday, February 22, 2021, or make a call anonymously to the charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.


Council supports 150m buffer zones around abortion clinics

A survey found a majority of women were made to feel uncomfortable by pro-life protests outside an Edinburgh clinic.

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Back Off Scotland says protests are a threat to privacy and right to access legal, essential medical services.

Edinburgh City Council has agreed to support the introduction of ‘buffer zones’ around abortion clinics in Scotland – to prevent women being harassed by pro-life campaigners.

The move follows repeated calls for 150-metre ‘no-protest zones’ to be erected outside the entrance to the Chalmers Street Sexual Health Centre, after a survey showed a majority of women are made to feel uncomfortable by pro-life protests outside of the clinic.

The results of the survey, carried out in partnership with the clinic over April, May and June of 2020, showed that 56% of the people visiting the clinic felt very uncomfortable due to the protesters, although 9% thought it was the right of the protesters to voice their opinions.

Back Off Scotland, a campaign group started by Edinburgh University students, was set up in response to the harassment of women seeking abortion healthcare at the Chalmers Street clinic.

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Anti-choice protests in Scotland date back to 1999, with hospitals and clinics across the country being targeted.

Protestors often approach patients directly and have distributed medically inaccurate leaflets. Even those not accessing abortion services are targeted, according to the group.

Back Off Scotland says protests are a threat to privacy and right to access legal, essential medical services.

Now, a petition organised by Back Off Scotland has been accepted by Edinburgh City Council, following a meeting of the local authority’s policy committee.

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The petition, which attracted more than 4800 signatures, stated: “Anti-choice activity directed at individuals threatens their right to privacy and right to access legal, essential medical services.

“Patients have reported feeling intimidated and harassed as they try to access medical care in confidence, and that tactics such as praying, rosaries, and medically incorrect leaflets make them feel pressured when accessing abortion and other sexual health services.

“Women not accessing abortion care are also targeted – with one woman with a pram being told ‘she hadn’t killed her baby so why would she support abortion’, and another being told she would die of cancer for having an abortion in the past.

“Both sites that provide abortion services in Edinburgh are targeted by protesters – there is no way for abortion patients to avoid them.

“Current law does not give the police the power to stop this harassment.”

Speaking at the debate, SNP council leader Adam McVey said: “There are certain principles I would certainly hope we would all be in agreement with – certainly the right to access healthcare facilities unimpeded when needed is one of the absolute cornerstones of our society, as is free speech.

“But free speech doesn’t give us the right to run into a crowded building and shout ‘fire’ at the top of our lungs – there has to be sensible parameters around how we engage in some of these questions as a society, that are very emotive for many people.

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“That principle of people being able to access healthcare if needed, when they needed, and unimpeded, is sacrosanct.”

Conservative opposition councillors did not explicitly oppose the aims of the petition, but did raise concerns that the matter of legislation is for the Scottish government, not a local authority.

Leader of the council’s Conservative group Iain Whyte said: “This issue is not within the competence of the council.

“In speaking to your proposal – it was mentioned that this is a national issue – and that is the best way of dealing with this.

“The petition calls for new legislation – that’s not a matter within the competence of the council, that’s for the Scottish Parliament to determine.”

Although the council cannot introduce the legislation itself, it will now engage with the Scottish government and the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA) to help support that aim.

Following the meeting, Back Off Scotland co-founder Lucy Grieve said: “Before we expanded our campaign nationally, our goal had been to get Edinburgh City Council to legitimise buffers city-wide.

“It’s a positive move that the council leader is now going to engage with the Scottish Government and COSLA in support of this matter because they, like us, believe that this issue is best tackled nationally.

“Protecting patients from intimidation and harassment when seeking healthcare is a bipartisan issue and one that requires action from the Scottish Government now.”

City Centre Green Party councillor Claire Miller, who has been a vocal supporter of the Back Off Scotland campaign, said: “I’m glad that the committee today agreed to work with other councils and the Scottish Government to protect everyone who needs to attend sexual health clinics.

“It is long overdue and I welcome moves to create safe buffer zones around sexual health centres so that everyone can attend without encountering protests.

“It’s just a shame that all councillors could not speak up with me, loud and clear, in unequivocal support for access to healthcare without harassment.

“I speak up on access to abortion because others feel it’s too dangerous for them – I am in public life to be a representative, and I won’t shy away from speaking out for people I represent.”

Story by local democracy reporter Joseph Anderson

Preferred bidder chosen to take over Prestwick Airport

The potential sale follows the collapse of a previous attempt to sell the South Ayrshire airport in 2020.

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Sale: Preferred bidder found for sale of Prestwick Airport.

A preferred bidder for the sale of Prestwick Airport has been found. 

It follows the collapse of a previous attempt to sell the South Ayrshire airport in 2020, after a would-be buyer pulled out of a deal in September. 

Prestwick Airport was taken into public ownership in November 2013 after being threatened with closure following heavy losses.

The Scottish Government paid a token £1 for the airport, which has since cost taxpayers tens of millions of pounds in failed loans.

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Transport secretary Michael Matheson confirmed a preferred bidder for the airport had been found.

In a letter to a parliament committee, he said: “We remain satisfied that good progress is being made in the interests of the business.”

The identity of the bidder has not yet been revealed. 


No internet until Thursday for some after cable explosion

A power cable exploded "like a hand grenade" damaging the copper network which, Openreach said, is more complicated to repair.

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Openreach is continuing major repairs in Bridgeton, Glasgow.

Some households and businesses will be without internet and phone services until late on Thursday as repairs continue in Glasgow’s east end.

Some people have had their online connections restored already after Openreach dispatched engineers to repair the faults first reported on Sunday night.

But after a power cable exploded “like a hand grenade” it damaged the copper network which, Openreach said, is more complicated to repair.

Each line needs to be reconnected individually the telecoms provided said, and this work will not be completed until late on Thursday, February 25.

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Openreach said the ongoing disruption should only affect a minority of users as major repairs in Bridgeton continue.

A fault with an underground cable on Abercromby Street knocked-out digital services for thousands and also affected the electrical supplies of around 15 customers.

Power was restored within a few hours on Sunday night, but phone and internet services continue to be affected with Scottish Power working with Openreach to carry out repairs.

Engineers expect to have more fibre-based broadband restored by Tuesday night, with some people already back online.

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Residents have been told that their routers may need to be rebooted and individual service providers should be able to offer assitance.

Openreach patch manager Andy Baillie said: “The power cable explosion was like a hand grenade going off underground, and the damage to one of our main East End cable routes is extensive.

“We’re working round the clock to get everyone back online as fast as we can. The repairs are complex but we’re making steady progress.

“We’re sorry for the ongoing disruption and thank residents for their patience and understanding while we work on the fix.”

A spokesperson for SP Energy Networks said: “We experienced an underground cable fault in the Bridgeton area on Sunday afternoon, affecting power supplies to around 15 customers.

“While power was restored within a few hours, we are aware the fault seems to have impacted a telecoms cable which lay underground nearby.

“We are supporting a team from Openreach to carry out a repair by identifying the exact location for them and isolating power so they can carry out their essential works safely.

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“We apologise for any inconvenience this may have caused.”

Olympic cyclist develops glasses to give riders reverse sight

The glasses use two-part, angled lenses with semi-transparent mirrors.

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The HindSight glasses allow cyclists to see forwards and backwards.

A Scottish Olympic gold medal winner has helped develop specialist glasses that give cyclists eyes in the back of their heads.

Callum Skinner developed the technology with physicist Alex Macdonald after raising more than £100,000 through a Kickstarter campaign.

The sunglasses allow cyclists to see forwards and backwards by shifting focus rather than having to turn their heads.

They use two-part angled lenses with semi-transparent mirrors and cost from £199.99.

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The Edinburgh-based inventors hope their glasses will make amateur cycling safer and give other athletes such as runners and rowers a performance edge.

Mr Skinner won gold and silver at the 2016 Summer Olympics.

He said: “As a passionate cyclist, I’m acutely aware of the importance of road safety.

“I’m also struck by the potential of HindSight glasses to help professional cyclists reach their peak performance.

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“Managing aerodynamic profile is essential for any elite cyclist and, by turning back to look over your shoulder, you can easily lose efficiencies in your speed and performance.

“I believe HindSight glasses provide the answer to this and will change the norm as we know it.”

Mr Macdonald, a former European inventor of the year, said: “As a regular cyclist, I was aware that knowing what was coming behind me would allow me to make smarter decisions, but I had no way to do it.

“HindSight glasses are designed to ensure the preservation of forward-facing vision, while adding the capacity to look behind.

“Hindsight glasses allow peripheral vision to be maintained in the forward direction while checking behind, giving effectively the best of both worlds.”

The glasses won a series of entrepreneurial development awards in 2020 including the Scottish Edge Award.

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