MPs begin investigation into whether Boris Johnson misled Parliament 

They wish to speak to those with knowledge of events at No 10 during the pandemic.

MPs begin investigation into whether Boris Johnson misled Parliament over partygate Flickr
The Prime Minister has faced a political storm over lockdown rule-breaking gatherings held during the pandemic.

MPs have begun their investigation into whether Boris Johnson lied to Parliament about illegal gatherings held at No 10 during the Covid pandemic.

Westminster’s Privileges Committee is seeking witness information in order to determine whether the Prime Minister misled the House of Commons.

They wish to speak with those with knowledge of the events that took place.

Johnson previously told MPs that “all guidance was followed completely in No 10” when asked directly whether a Christmas party was thrown in Downing Street.

However, he later apologised after being fined by the Met Police for breaking lockdown rules.

Westminster’s Privileges Committee is now looking into what evidence there is of Johnson knowing about those events in Downing Street and the Cabinet Office.

And it will examine whether there were any briefings give or inquiries made to the Prime Minister relating to those events.

The committee has confirmed that it is also willing to take oral or written evidence from people who wish to remain anonymous.

Labour MP Harriet Harman has been elected as the chair of the committee.

The Rt Honourable Sir Ernest Ryder, former Lord of Justice of Appeal and senior president of tribunals, will also be appointed as an adviser to the committee.

The scandal of lockdown rule-breaking at No 10 and across Whitehall has caused a political storm for the Prime Minister since a clip of Allegra Stratton joking about a Christmas party first emerged.

After further revelations emerged of Covid regulations being flouted, public anger grew, as well as discontent amongst Conservative backbenchers.

It led to a confidence vote in the Prime Minister earlier this month.

And although Johnson managed to win the vote, a significant number of his MPs, 148, voted against him remaining in office.

Usually, it is a resigning matter if a minister is found to have intentionally misled Parliament.