Carer ‘pushed resident to floor and said another should just die’

Jacqueline Taylor has been struck off the care register by the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC).

Carer ‘pushed resident to floor and said another should just die’ iStock
Care: Jacqueline Taylor has been struck off the register.

A care home worker who reportedly pushed a resident to the floor and said another should “just die” has been struck off the register.

Jacqueline Taylor was working as a care assistant in Arbroath, Angus, when she allegedly pulled a man’s fingers back to remove a cup of tea from his grasp.

While making their way out of the lounge, Taylor then reportedly pushed the resident forward, causing him to hit his left side against the partition door on the way down to the ground.

Whilst the resident was lying on the floor, Taylor was said to have told colleagues “just leave him there” or words to that effect.

The incident reportedly happened in November 2020.

At some point between October and December 2020, Taylor also allegedly said in front of colleagues that another resident “should just die” or words to that effect.

Taylor admitted that she told co-workers to leave the man on the floor but denied all the other allegations. However, the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) ruled against her and found her fitness to practise impaired.

A removal order was issued earlier last month, which came into effect on August 25.

In a written ruling, the SSSC said: “Social services workers are expected not to abuse or harm people who use services or put people at unnecessary risk.

“You pulled a resident’s fingers back, carried out an act of physical violence by deliberately pushing the resident forward, shout ‘get him out of here’ and forcefully push the resident forward, causing him to fall.

“While the resident was on the floor you said to colleagues to just leave him there which demonstrated a lack of empathy.

“The resident was entitled to place his trust in you to care for him and act in his best interests. Your actions abused this trust and harmed the resident.

“This behaviour raises concerns over your values and is attitudinal in nature.

“It falls far short of the standards expected from you as a registered worker in a caring profession.”

In response to Taylor allegedly saying another resident “should just die”, the watchdog stated: “This is inappropriate, disrespectful and placed a resident at risk of emotional harm.”

Taylor, who had no previous history of misconduct with the SSSC, provided positive character references and engaged with the process.

However, the SSSC noted that she continued to deny all the allegations except for telling co-workers to leave the man on the floor.

The SSSC stated: “You deny the allegations against you which we have evidence to prove.

“As such, no comfort can be taken from any insight, remorse or regret.

“Your behaviour was deliberate and is attitudinal in nature. It represents a pattern of behaviour, which is concerning.

“The nature of the behaviour is such that it is hard to remediate as it raises concerns over your character and attitude.

“As such, there remains a risk of the behaviour being repeated which raises public protection concerns.

“If your behaviour were to be repeated, service users could be placed at risk of emotional and physical harm.”

In conclusion, the watchdog said a removal order was the “most appropriate sanction” to maintain the “continuing trust and confidence in the social service profession and the SSSC as the regulator of the profession”.