Public encouraged ‘not to visit’ new rewilded nature reserve

Land owners said they wish to keep the 'land untouched and wildlife undisturbed'.

Public encouraged ‘not to visit’ new rewilded nature reserve Ae-photos via iStock
The land owners have said that Glen Nant is 'untouched ancient oak woodland'.

Land owners have urged the public not to visit a newly rewilded national nature reserve in the Highlands.

Highland Titles, the owners of Glen Nant, have discouraged the public from visiting, saying “we wish to keep the land untouched and wildlife undisturbed”.

The nature reserve, located to the south of Taynuilt, is home to red squirrels, woodpeckers, warblers, and over two km of the River Nant.

The owners have said the land at Glen Nant is ‘untouched ancient oak woodland’ and have confirmed they will not sell any of the area.

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Douglas Wilson, CEO of Highland Titles said: “As far as Glen Nant goes, we purchased this land last year and inherited the existing agreement with Nature Scot, who will manage the land for the foreseeable future.

“As much as we’d like to encourage people to visit the land, Nature Scot are worried about the effects that a greatly increased footfall may cause.

“People are absolutely free to visit the land if they wish but we agreed at Nature Scot’s request not to actively encourage thousands of visitors to the area given that the land has been designated as SSSI and SAC.

“I seem to recall that one of the access bridges was broken too (on public land, not ours). We offered to repair it at our expense, but haven’t heard back yet.

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“There are not many organisations who have done more than we have to encourage people to visit and responsibly enjoy the great outdoors.”

A NatureScot spokesperson said: “There is no requirement on Highland Titles to actively promote visits to the small part of the Glen Nant NNR their own.

“However, people are welcome to visit it. Under the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003, everyone has rights of responsible access to most land in Scotland, which include enjoying nature.

“This provides vital positive opportunities to enjoy and connect with our natural environment – and the Scottish Outdoor Access Code helps people to do this without causing damage or disturbance.”

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