Fancy living on a remote Scottish island?

The community trust which runs the Isle of Rum is looking for residents to rent four new 'eco-homes'.

Ian Mitchell/ Creative Commons
New homes: Isle of Rum.

A remote Scottish island is looking for residents to move into four new homes.

The Hebridean island of Rum is around 30 miles off the west coast and has a population of between 30-40.

The Isle of Rum Community Trust (IRCT) which runs the island said the four “eco homes” were available for “affordable rent”.

The two-bedroom properties sit on the edge of Kinloch, the island’s only village, and have views up to the Rum Cullin mountains.  

The ‘eco homes’ sit on the edge of Kinloch.
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Red deer, feral goats, Highland cattle and ponies are said to roam free across the island.  

The trust also said there were jobs opportunities in childcare, food production, house maintenance, fish farming or marine and mountain tourism. 

Following the recent restrictions due to the coronavirus lockdown, the Rum community now hope the houses will be completed by September and are keen to welcome new residents soon after. 

‘With only one child in nursery and two in our primary school we need more families to fill our school as well as to be the next generation of islanders.’

Local resident, Lesley Watt

Local resident, Lesley Watt, said: “We have a population of around 32 people, including six children. 

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“With only one child in nursery and two in our primary school we need more families to fill our school as well as to be the next generation of islanders.”   

The homes were largely funded by the Scottish Government and the IRCT’s chairman, Cllr Denis Rixson, noted: “Without the substantial support of the Scottish Government’s Rural and Islands Housing Fund the project could not have moved beyond the feasibility stage”.  

Further financial support was provided by commercial fish farm company, Mowi, who have a farm on the north coast of the island, with additional funding from hotel group, The Crerar Trust.  

Housing application forms and further information are available here.

Main image: © Copyright Ian Mitchell and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.


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