What to expect from the 12 Premiership clubs this season

The Premiership gets under way this weekend with hopes high a vintage season could lie ahead.

The battle for the Premiership title begins this weekend. Craig Williamson via SNS Group
The battle for the Premiership title begins this weekend.

The friendlies have finished, the League Cup is on the back burner and the European competitions can be forgotten this weekend – the Premiership is back.

After the strangest season in history, fans are looking for a return to normality, insofar as Scottish football is ever normal.

The numbers may not be at the levels anyone wants yet, but there will be supporters in every stadium on the opening weekend, and they’ll all have hopes and expectations.

The promotion of Hearts and Dundee brings back a couple of city derbies, and clubs across the league have been strengthening.

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We’ve looked at each side and how they are prepared for the challenges ahead.

Aberdeen

Jay Emanuel-Thomas and Christian Ramirez make up a new-look Aberdeen attack. (Photo by Craig Foy / SNS Group)

Stephen Glass may have taken charge towards the end of last season, but this summer feels like the start of something new at Pittodrie. Scott Brown has joined as player-coach, along with a handful of exciting new signings.

The first major test was encouraging, with a 5-1 demolition of Hacken thrilling fans, but there’s a big challenge ahead to finish high in the Premiership and compete for silverware. Last season brought a fourth-place finish and a points tally closer to the bottom than the top.

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Improvement is expected and excitement around the club is high.

Celtic

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Ange Postecoglou has taken on the job of revamping and reviving Celtic’s squad. (Photo by Paul Devlin / SNS Group)

After their domestic dominance ended in spectacular fashion, Celtic start this campaign under a new manager; Ange Postecoglou has vowed to deliver attacking, entertaining football.

He’ll attempt to do so with a new-look squad. Five players have been added and many more are needed as they attempt to mount a title challenge. Kristoffer Ajer – a mainstay in the defence – has gone and striker Odsonne Eduoard is set to follow suit.

A big turnaround of players will present challenges, not least how quickly they settle and gel. The club’s elimination from the Champions League has already put them behind the eight ball.

Supporters’ anger following the defeat to Midtylland is directed towards the board, not Postecogolou, who at his first media conferences warned he needed new signings ‘’yesterday’’.

Unless the Australian gets the backing he needs to win trophies, this could be another long season for the Celtic faithful.

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Dundee

Dundee’s attack will be vital to their survival hopes. (Photo by Ross Parker / SNS Group)

James McPake’s side earned their Premiership place the hard way, coming through the play-offs after a testing Championship season, and they’ll find no respite on their return to the top flight.

The core of last season’s team remains, with Charlie Adam’s experience and skill a hugely valuable asset. Cillian Sheridan and Luke McCowan have arrived to offer new options in an attack that already features Jason Cummings.

The return of derbies against United will be a welcome addition to the calendar, but in the bigger picture, Dundee’s main task is to steer clear of the drop zone.

Local bragging rights are a bonus.

Dundee United

Dundee United have put their faith in Tam Courts (Photo by Paul Devlin / SNS Group)

United were a year ahead of their city neighbours in returning to the top division and made a decent fist of re-establishing themselves with a ninth-place finish.

Regardless, the club made a big change, allowing manager Micky Mellon to return to Tranmere and promoting Tam Courts from within. Courts will be expected to showcase the young talent the club has traditionally produced, and deliver attacking football while climbing the table. It’s no small task.

There hasn’t been much in the way of recruitment, but Charlie Mulgrew has returned and his know-how could be crucial. A flawless record in the League Cup group stage was an encouraging start for Courts and the new project, but the pressure could be on if a difficult-looking start sees the team fail to deliver points.

Hearts

Hearts have made a strong start in the League Cup. (Photo by Ross Parker / SNS Group)

Hearts did exactly what was required of them last season, lifting the Championship trophy to ensure their controversial exit from the Premiership lasted just one season. The Tynecastle club returns with greater ambition than just staying up.

Any notion that manager Robbie Neilson came out of promotion as a conquering hero should be set aside, though. Cup exits to Alloa and Brora last year brought anger from fans, and the team’s performances at times throughout the league season means he faces a job to win around the support.

Neilson hasn’t added extensively to his squad, yet, but the team that came up has plenty of top-level experience and doesn’t lack for leadership. The League Cup has provided a smooth warm-up, with four wins from four, but two games against Celtic and a match against Aberdeen before the end of August mean that Hearts fans will have a clearer idea of their side’s prospects sooner rather than later.

Hibernian

Hibs hope to juggle European football with domestic competition. (Photo by Ross Parker / SNS Group)

League Cup semi-finalists, Scottish Cup finalists and third in the Premiership last season. On paper it’s a successful season, but the Hibs faithful feel opportunities were missed.

This time around, Jack Ross has the unenviable task of delivering progress on what’s already a reasonably high bar. The manager started his recruitment early, landing Daniel MacKay from Inverness, made Jamie Murphy’s move from Rangers permanent and added Jake Doyle-Hayes from St Mirren.

There will be further additions, most likely, but Hibs’ hopes may also hinge on whether there are departures. Interest in Ryan Porteous and Kevin Nisbet was rebuffed last season and with a new chief executive in place, Hibs aim to build on what they have. That ambition could be tested, especially if progress in Europe means a juggling of priorities.

Livingston

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David Martindale hopes to mastermind another impressive league campaign. (Photo by Rob Casey / SNS Group)

From the point David Martindale stepped into the manager’s job last season, it quickly became a memorable one for the Livi fans. A long, long unbeaten run helped the team to a top-six finish and the League Cup final.

Now, the work is on to match or better what surprised most of Scottish football last term. Ten new faces have arrived, including Andrew Shinnie and Bruce Anderson, but just as many have left the club. Martindale will have to hope the new signings click if they are to avoid taking a step backwards.

The fixture list has already given Livi a tough task in the early weeks, with matches against last season’s top four within the first six games.

Motherwell

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Graham Alexander will look to deliver an improvement on last season. (Photo by Bruce White / SNS Group)

For the club that finished third in the shortened 2019-20 season, last term was a depressing drop in standards for the Steelmen.

Now Graham Alexander has had a transfer window and a pre-season to put his mark on the squad. Declan Gallagher and Devante Cole are among the departures and leave huge shoes to fill, but Alexander has made nine signings, including the impressive Liam Kelly on a permanent deal. Dutch striker Kevin van Veen worked with the manager before, suggesting he’s far from a gamble.

The side came through the League Cup group stages with nine points, but narrow wins over Queen’s Park and Queen of the South, as well as a surprise 2-0 loss to Airdrie, indicate that Motherwell are far from flying.

Rangers

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Rangers have strengthened as they aim to defend their title. (Photo by Alan Harvey / SNS Group)

After steering Rangers to their first title in ten years, Steven Gerrard is hungry for more success. And supporters want more, too. Unsurprisingly, they are odds-on favourites with the bookies to win the Premiership, but success in the cups will also be a target. By Gerrard’s own admission, one trophy out of nine under his watch is ”not good enough”.  

The big and early test comes in Europe. They must successfully negotiate two qualifying rounds to reach the lucrative group stage of the Champions League, something the club last achieved a decade ago.

The signing of Fashion Sakala looks a tidy bit of business, as does the capture of John Lundstram. Departures? Alfredo Morelos’ future is again a hot topic. In a recent interview, the Rangers manager was unable to answer if the striker would be at the club this season. Glen Kamara may have caught the eye of potential suitors after impressing for Finland at the Euros.

With [just over] a month to go before the transfer window closes, speculation over players’ futures will no doubt continue.

Ross County

County have turned to Malky Mackay to lead the team this season. (Photo by Paul Devlin / SNS Group)

While Rangers are odds-on to win the league, Ross County are the shortest price to finish bottom and it’s easy to see why. John Hughes steered the club to a narrow escape from the drop last year, but promptly left to seek new challenges, leaving the club to lick its wounds.

Enter Malky Mackay, a controversial choice given his past, but also a manager with extensive experience.

Mackay has brought in players, including Ross Callachan from Hamilton, and stated an intent to make an impression on the league, but County look the least well-equipped at this stage and face an uphill struggle. Late signings may make a difference, but a relegation battle looks inevitable.

St Johnstone

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St Johnstone had a season to remember in 2020/21. (Photo by Rob Casey / SNS Group)

What constitutes success for St Johnstone this season after the incredible heroics that saw them win both cups and finish fifth in the league?

Ever the pragmatist, Callum Davidson’s first aim will be to stay in the Premiership, but the team that played with such assurance last year should have no worries on that score and will make a top-six place a more realistic target. Beyond that, it may be down to how many of the core of that side are prised away before the window closes – and how they are replaced.

On-loan centre-back Hayden Muller looks capable of maintaining Saints’ defensive solidity, while left-back Reece Devine joined from Manchester United for the season and looks to be another shrewd addition

On paper, another solid season, with the capability for another cup run or two, looks in the offing, with the added excitement and demands of European football, where an intriguing tie against Galatasaray will result in either Europa League progress or a Conference League play-off place.

Davidson showed last season he could squeeze the maximum out of a small squad with discipline, attitude and belief, as well as no little talent. Pulling off a repeat with league expectations, defence of two trophies and continental competition would add to his rapidly growing reputation.

St Mirren

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Jim Goodwin believes he can make St Mirren a top-six team. (Photo by Mark Scates / SNS Group)

After falling short of their publicly stated top-six ambition by the finest of margins, Jim Goodwin and his side are setting out with exactly the same target this time around.

The buzz around St Mirren following the completion of the supporters’ buy-out adds another positive in Paisley and hopes will be high that the new era can start off with success.

So far, Saints have held on to the stars of last season, and made it clear that anyone coming for Jamie McGrath will be paying a good price, and paying early enough that a quality replacement can be found. It’s not just about the goal-scoring midfielder, though, a dependable defence remains together for now and the club’s young talents like Ethan Erhahon and Jay Henderson will only get better.

Goodwin has also added wisely, bringing in players with experience of the league. Greg Kiltie and Alan Power joined from relegated Kilmarnock, while Charles Dunne arrived from Motherwell and Curtis Main has bolstered the attack.

Last season showed real progress from a club that had been accustomed to a relegation battle and, even given the increased competition in the league, Goodwin and his players will be focused on taking that next step and a top-half finish.


Soldiers begin deployment to ambulance service amid ‘crisis point’

More than 200 army personnel have been deployed to assist the service.

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Soldiers throughout the country have started supporting the Scottish Ambulance Service amid growing NHS pressures.

More than 200 army personnel have been deployed to assist the service by driving ambulances and operating mobile coronavirus testing units.

The Scottish Government requested military assistance to help deal with deteriorating response times after reports of patients dying and waiting in agony for hours before paramedics arrived.

After a grandad died having waited 40 hours for paramedics, a doctor told STV News the Scottish Ambulance Service is at “crisis point”.

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Over 100 are soldiers are driving ambulances this weekend with a further 111 operating the testing units that the military also previously helped run the units during the height of the pandemic last year.

The Ministry of Defence said its staff, including members of the The Royal Highland Fusiliers, were expected to be deployed for a couple of months.

Health secretary Humza Yousaf said on Friday that he will “leave no stone unturned” as part of efforts to improve both the ambulance response times and increase capacity in Scotland’s hospitals.

After meeting some of the soldiers being trained at the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service base in Hamilton, Yousaf said: “I’m delighted to be here to thank the military personnel who really answered our call, with their support and their help.”


Large queues at petrol stations amid fuel shortage panic

Drivers have been queuing at petrol stations across the country.

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Large queues have been forming at petrol stations across Scotland amid fears of a fuel shortage.

The scenes come despite assurances from the UK Government that drivers should continue to “fill up as normal”.

Delivery issues led to several garage closures throughout the country on Thursday.

Esso owner ExxonMobil said a “small number” of Tesco Alliance petrol forecourts have been impacted by disruption to petrol deliveries.

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BP told the UK Government in a meeting last Thursday that the company’s ability to transport fuel from refineries to its network of forecourts was faltering.

The Road Haulage Association and the AA have both tried to ease concerns by saying there will be enough fuel to go around and that the delivery issues, blamed on a shortage of HGV drivers, were consigned to a small number of areas.

But the advice failed to have the desired effect and on Friday as drivers could be seen queuing at stations in areas including Port Glasgow, Stirling and East Kilbride.

Others took to social media to document the crowds gathering at garages throughout Scotland.

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Twitter user Derek Geddes posted a picture of a garage packed out with several rows of cars waiting their turn.

Robert McCallion said: “It appears the “Don’t Panic Buy Fuel” message has worked a treat Massive queues at every petrol station from Wemyss Bay to Port Glasgow It’s all going well.”

And Ian Martin Tweeted: “In a very long queue at Tesco petrol in Port Glasgow. We’re in trouble aren’t we?”

On Thursday BP’s head of UK retail Hanna Hofer said it was important the Government understood the “urgency of the situation”, which she described as “bad, very bad”.


Stopping benefits to EU citizens without settled status ‘unnecessary’

Jenny Gilruth, Europe minister with the Scottish Government, raised her concerns about the move in a letter to Therese Coffey.

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Jenny Gilruth said action to stop payments is 'unnecessary and disproportionate'.

Halting benefit payments to European citizens living in the UK who have not yet applied for settled status is “unnecessary” and could force some into homelessness, the work and pensions secretary has been told.

Jenny Gilruth, Europe minister with the Scottish Government, raised her concerns about the move in a letter to Therese Coffey.

After the UK left the European Union, EU nationals were given until June 30 to apply for settled status – with this giving them the right to live, work and study in Britain, as well as use the NHS and receive any benefits they might be eligible for.

Gilruth said that after the deadline for applying to the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS) had passed, the Department for Work and Pensions continued to make social security payments to EU citizens who had not done so.

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But, in a letter to the work and pensions secretary, she said she understood that the UK Government is “suspending these payments at the end of September and discontinue them completely from the end of October”.

The Scottish Government minister warned of the possible consequences of this, saying it was “essential” than an impact assessment be carried out.

She said: “I am concerned that vulnerable citizens in Scotland will have their payments stopped.

“Poor literacy, a lack of knowledge of English, mental and physical illnesses and disability are all reasons why someone may not have applied to the EUSS.

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“Terminating benefits may lead to homelessness, destitution, hunger and poor physical and mental health.”

Gilruth continued: “Action to stop payments is unnecessary and disproportionate with a clear risk of harm to people who require our support.”

She called on the UK Government to “continue providing ongoing social security payments to EU citizens until they have applied to the EUSS”.

This would allow “our EU citizen friends and family to continue living their lives with the dignity and respect that they deserve”, the minister insisted.

A UK Government spokesman said: “We continue to use every possible channel, including letters, telephone calls, texts, and the direct contact our frontline staff have with their customers, to encourage those who are eligible to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme.

“By doing so, they can secure their status so they can continue to reside, work, study and access services and benefits in the UK.

“Nearly 5 million people have been given status through the hugely successful EU Settlement Scheme to date, with thousands more cases granted every week.

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“Letters are being sent to those who may still need to apply to let them know how to urgently put in a late application.”

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Scottish Government U-turns on Covid testing rules for travellers

Transport secretary says Scottish Government 'reluctantly concluded' that alignment with the UK is 'the best option'.

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The Scottish Government has U-turned over its testing regime for international travellers.

Transport secretary Michael Matheson announced on Friday that Scotland will now align with the UK Government in easing testing for people arriving from overseas.

It comes just a week after the Scottish Government decided not to follow its UK counterparts in dropping the need for a pre-departure negative test and allowing vaccinated travellers to replace the day two PCR test with a cheaper lateral flow test.

Matheson said last week the UK Government’s proposals “could weaken our ability to protect the public health of Scotland’s communities”.

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He reiterated those concerns on Friday but said the Scottish Government recognises “not having UK wide alignment causes significant practical problems and creates disadvantages for Scottish businesses”.

It means the need for pre-departure tests for fully vaccinated travellers arriving in Scotland will now be removed from the end of October.

Travellers from non-red list countries who have been fully vaccinated in a country that meets recognised standards of certifications will no longer be required to provide evidence of a negative test result before they can travel to Scotland.

Scotland will also align with the UK post-arrival testing regime once the details are finalised.

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Matheson said: “We have urgently considered all these implications, weighing any possible impact on the public health and the logistical realities.

“After liaising at length with stakeholders from the aviation sector to understand the impact of adopting a different approach in Scotland, we have reluctantly concluded that, for practical reasons, alignment with the UK is the best option.

“The new proposals make clear pre-departure tests will no longer be a requirement. We also intend to align with the UK post-arrival testing regime.

“The detail of that is still being developed with lateral flow tests being considered and we will engage further with the UK Government on those plans. Details will be announced at the same time as the UK.”

Derek Provan, chief executive of AGS Airports Ltd, which owns and operates Aberdeen and Glasgow airports, said the decision “is a welcome step forward”.

He said: “While this is something we have been urging the Scottish Government to do for months, and the subsequent delay has negatively impacted the industry in Scotland and AGS as a group, it is a welcome step forward.

“By ensuring Scotland has parity with the rest of the UK, this decision is one that will deliver much-needed consumer confidence for our passengers to start travelling again and for our airline partners to look at increasing capacity at our airports.

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“A number of restrictions on travel still remain in place and we are not yet back to anything like normal operations, but we will continue to engage with government to ensure the safe return on international travel continues and that we can rebuild the connectivity that plans a vital role in supporting our economy.”

Edinburgh Airport published a report on Thursday claiming the recovery of Scotland’s aviation sector is the slowest in the UK and continues to lag behind the rest of Europe.

The airport’s chief executive Gordon Dewar that was due to tighter restrictions and slower relaxations.

Dewar said on Friday: “We appreciate the Scottish Government’s moves to listen to industry this week and we understand their concerns, but we do think there must be more proportionality when it comes to balancing both the protection of public health and the importance of Scotland’s economic recovery.

“We look forward to continuing to work with the government to address concerns and ensure Scotland’s industries can restart as safely as possible.”

The Scottish Government acknowledged on Friday that if non-alignment led to travellers to Scotland choosing to route through airports elsewhere in the UK, the public health benefits of testing “would be undermined in any event”.

Scottish Conservatives shadow transport minister Graham Simpson said: “This SNP climbdown will come as a relief to businesses in Scotland’s much overlooked tourism and aviation industries.

However, such a late U-turn means Scottish airports have missed out on any potential recovery that could have been made during the October break.

“The SNP-Green Government need to realise that this affects more than just holidaymakers and the aviation industry. Their slow decision will have had a damaging impact on jobs and businesses in Scotland.”

It was announced last week that green and amber classifications will merge from October 4 but the red list will be retained for those countries deemed to have high Covid-19 case rates or variants of concern.

UK transport secretary Grant Shapps said earlier this week, however, that no firm date has been set for the removal of PCR testing for fully vaccinated travellers.

Asked when the policy will be implemented, Shapps told the Commons Transport Select Committee that the Department of Health and Social Care is “aware” of the dates of October half-term, which is a popular period for families to go on holiday.

Leigh Griffiths charged by police over ‘smoke bomb incident’

Dundee striker charged with 'culpable and reckless conduct' in connection with an alleged incident at Dens Park.

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Leigh Griffiths has joined Dundee on loan until the end of the season.

Dundee striker Leigh Griffiths has been charged with “culpable and reckless conduct” in relation to an alleged incident at Dens Park on Wednesday.

Griffiths has been accused of kicking a smoke bomb at St Johnstone fans during a Premier Sports Cup quarter-final clash.

Police were investigating the incident and on Friday they said a 31-year-old man had been charged.

A Police Scotland spokesperson said: “Police Scotland can confirm that a 31-year-old man has been charged in relation to culpable and reckless conduct, following an incident at Dens Park, Dundee, on Wednesday, September 22.

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“A report will be submitted to the Procurator Fiscal.”

Griffiths could also face action from the football authorities over the alleged incident but the Scottish FA are unlikely to begin disciplinary proceedings while a criminal case is active.


More than 100 high-end cars stolen by thieves using signal boosters

The cars have been taken from outside homes in Edinburgh, Forth Valley, East Lothian, Midlothian, West Lothian, Fife and Dundee.

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Warning: Police are advising motorists to store electric fobs in signal blocking equipment.

More than 100 high-end cars have been stolen from homes across parts of Scotland in recent months, with police warning thieves are using technology to open the cars without having to steal keys.

Police Scotland said that since May, 119 vehicles have been stolen from outside homes in Edinburgh, Forth Valley, East Lothian, Midlothian, West Lothian, Fife and Dundee.

The thieves have either broken into the house and stolen the car keys from near the front door or used a signal amplifying device to pick up the frequency of the car key from outside the home, meaning they can steal the car without breaking into the house.

Police are urging people with electric key fobs to buy signal-blocking storage to help prevent the crimes.

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The break-ins and thefts mainly occur either in the late evening or early morning, when the householders are in bed, and all are being investigated as part of Operation Greenbay.

Most thefts have taken place in Edinburgh, where 40 such cars were stolen, followed by 33 in the Lothians, 19 in Tayside, 16 in Fife and 11 in Forth Valley.

Detective Inspector Karen Muirhead said: “Whenever a housebreaking or vehicle theft occurs, it has a profound impact on the victims and as part of Operation Greenbay we are actively investigating all of these incidents to identify those responsible and reunite stolen cars with their rightful owners.

“Preventing these crimes happening in the first instance is our top priority and the public have a vital role to play in this.

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“I would urge all homeowners to consider what their current home security looks like and evaluate if it could be enhanced through the use of measures such as alarms, motion-activated lights and CCTV.”

She added: “For those with electric key fobs, please consider buying a faraday box or pouch, which blocks the signal from being detected and amplified to open and start your vehicle. At the very least, please do not leave keys near the door or entryway of your home.

“Following engagement with victims, we have established that many prefer to leave keys and valuables near doors so that in the event their homes are broken into, thieves do not venture further inside the property.

“In our experience, the likelihood of this occurring is extremely rare, with most criminals seeking an easy and quick grab, rather than having to search the entire house.”

She urged anyone with information on the crimes to contact police via 101 or alternatively make an anonymous report to Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.


Working at GB News almost gave me a breakdown, claims Andrew Neil

He said he felt like he could no longer continue after the first week.

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Neil announced his departure from the channel earlier this month.

Veteran broadcaster Andrew Neil said he “came close to a breakdown” during his time at GB News after suffering from stress due to the fledgling station’s technical problems.

Neil announced his departure from the channel in a tweet earlier this month where he said it was “time to reduce my commitments on a number of fronts”.

But the split between the new channel and its chairman and lead presenter has become increasingly bitter, with the 72-year-old since saying his former employer “unilaterally” cancelled his exit deal and he “couldn’t be happier” to have severed ties.

And in an interview with the Daily Mail, Neil said he walked away from a £4m contract but added continuing with the channel “would have killed me”.

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“It was a big decision but I frankly couldn’t care if it was £40m,” he said.

Speaking previously on Question Time, Neil said he had been in a “minority of one” over the future direction of GB News, which has been accused of trying to import Fox News-style journalism to the UK.

“More and more differences emerged between myself and the other senior managers and the board of GB News,” he said.

But in the interview with the Mail, he said he felt like he could no longer continue after the first week.

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He said: “It just got worse and worse. At one stage, we were waiting to go on air and the whole system went down. It had to be rebooted and we only managed it with 15 seconds to spare.

“That stress was just huge. It meant you couldn’t think about the journalism.

“By the end of that first week, I knew I had to get out. It was really beginning to affect my health. I wasn’t sleeping. I was waking up at two or three in the morning.”

He added the stress gave him a “constant knot in my stomach” and the paper reported two directors suggested Neil take July and August off with a promise the early glitches would be sorted by September.

A number of big names joined GB News for its launch including ITV News journalist Alastair Stewart, BBC journalist Simon McCoy and former Labour MP Gloria De Piero.

Guto Harri quit the channel following a row over him taking the knee during a debate on the racism directed towards England football players, while other staff members have reportedly left.

In a statement from the channel carried by the Mail, a spokesman said: “At no point did Andrew raise concerns of the editorial direction of GB News moving to the right.

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“As with all companies, decision-making rests with the board, and GB News is no different.

“As a member of the board, Andrew had the same rights and abilities to raise concerns, and he was privy to all decisions.

“The board allowed Andrew time off over the summer to recharge his batteries. He subsequently asked to leave and the board agreed to this request.

“The terms of his departure were properly negotiated and documented, with Andrew taking legal advice throughout.”


Legionella bacteria found in water supply at hospital

NHS Lanarkshire said routine water sampling had discovered the bacteria at Monklands Hospital in Airdrie.

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Monklands Hospital in Airdrie.

Patients have been assured that the risk of contracting Legionnaires’ disease is “extremely low” after bacteria was found in the water supply at a hospital.

NHS Lanarkshire said routine water sampling had discovered legionella bacteria in the renal and endoscopy units at Monklands Hospital in Airdrie.

Filters have now been placed on basins and shower outlets in the units and in a ward served by the same water tank.

No patients are showing any signs of the disease.

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Susan Friel, nurse director for acute services at NHS Lanarkshire, said: “We are working closely with microbiology and facilities colleagues to put in place further steps following these results to ensure the safety of patients and staff.

“This includes sampling on a regular basis until we have a full set of negative samples, and filters remaining in place for as long as required.

“We want to reassure our patients and staff that the risk of contracting legionella disease with this particular strain is extremely low and the measures we have taken are precautionary while we continue to sample the water.”

She added that infection prevention and control measures are in place and no patients are showing signs of legionnaires disease, but staff will continue to monitor the situation in the coming days.

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Christina Coulombe, head of infection prevention and control at the health board, added: “There have been no toilets closed but handwashing facilities are out of commission as a precautionary measure while testing is ongoing.

“The option of portable sinks was discussed with staff and have now been provided in the areas requested by staff. Senior staff in all three areas can request further portable sinks by contacting facilities colleagues.”


Dad believes son was given ‘secret drugs’ due to hospital hygiene fears

David Campbell believes his son was given 'secret' supply of disease-prevention drugs while receiving treatment on cancer ward.

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Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow is at centre of inquiry.

The father of a boy being treated for cancer said he believes his child was given a “secret” supply of disease-prevention drugs amid a period of “covered-up” hospital-acquired infections at a children’s cancer ward.

David Campbell’s son was diagnosed with a rare type of cancer in August 2018 when he was four-years-old.

The boy was being treated in the Royal Hospital for Children (RHC) and Queen Elizabeth University Hospital (QEUH) campus in Glasgow, which are at the centre of an inquiry into problems that contributed to the deaths of two children.

The inquiry was ordered after patients died from infections linked to pigeon droppings and the water supply.

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Mr Campbell told the inquiry his son was given a “cocktail” of antifungals and prophylactics as part of his cancer treatment “as a precaution in case anything should crop up”, before he was aware of the hospital hygiene concerns.

But after reading reports about water contamination at RHC in the media, he began to raise questions about the extra supply of antifungals to children in the cancer ward.

He told the inquiry he was not told about one of the drugs – posaconazole – being part of his son’s medical plan, adding “if I ever was, then it was not fully explained why and what the gravity of taking it would be”.

He said: “All we got was a generic handout put under the door to say that it was a medication that the children were going to be put on as protocol, it was better to be safe than sorry.”

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Mr Campbell said in hindsight he recognised the drug potentially helped his son fight off a hospital-acquired infection, but said his child should have been in a sterile and safe environment.

“It doesn’t make it right, giving them an anti-venom and letting the snake keep biting away at them,” he added:

“It’s absurd and that’s what they’ve done because in that environment it was all wrong.

“So they seem to think by giving them the prophylactics it made it acceptable.”

The inquiry heard Mr Campbell wrote to Jonathan Best, the chief operating officer at NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC), on January 6 last year about his concerns over the “secret use of prophylactics and other environmental issues” at the hospital.

According to a statement from Mr Campbell, Mr Best replied saying that the health board was first aware of issues in the wards in 2018 and that the health board was “alarmed” to hear about children being put on prophylactics secretly, and that families should have been spoken to about it.

In response, Mr Campbell said NHSGGC’s claims it first knew of the water contamination issues in 2018 are “preposterous”.

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He told the inquiry: “I can’t fathom it at all.

“Especially after whistleblower evidence in 2017 from senior clinicians and people in respectable positions in the healthcare environment.

“So for the NHS chief operating officer to tell me that he had no idea up until 2018 is not only insulting, it’s offensive.”

He added: “There is a massive cover-up going on here, a web of deceit that can only be explained by their (health board) silence.

“It would give me a lot of closure if I could get my questions answered and move forward.”

In a closing statement to the inquiry, Mr Campbell said: “This Glasgow flagship hospital is where children were given cocktails of strong drugs to prevent them from dying – by this I don’t mean what was agreed by parents for their children to fight these life-threatening cancers – I mean the incredibly powerful anti-fungal medicine pumped into them to save their wee lives from the dangers of the building that was allegedly saving them.

“Does anyone understand how much fear that creates? That feeling of total helplessness knowing there is nowhere else to go.

“To be given a chance to fight cancer you need a fortress, our fortress was rotten from within.”

Earlier this year, an independent review found the deaths of two children at the QEUH campus were at least in part the result of infections linked to the hospital environment.

It found a third of these infections were “most likely” to have been linked to the hospital environment.

The inquiry in Edinburgh, chaired by Lord Brodie, continues. Health boards are due to give their evidence at a later date.


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