Coronavirus: Which countries are on the quarantine list?

Scotland has quarantine measures in place for most countries - but a number of nations are exempt.

Travel: Coronavirus has disrupted holidays around the globe. Pixabay
Travel: Coronavirus has disrupted holidays around the globe.

Quarantine measures are in place for Scots returning from the majority of nations around the world.

It means people have to self-isolate at home for 14 days when they get back from holidays or visits to a swathe of countries – or risk a £480 fine for non-compliance.

On the other side, there is a smaller list of countries which the Scottish Government has decided to create so-called “air bridges” with.

These are generally countries deemed as safe as or safer than Scotland in terms of levels of coronavirus in the territory.

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When you go on holiday to these countries, you don’t need to quarantine for 14 days when you return home.

But you must isolate for 14 days if you arrive back from Canada, the US, much of Central and South America, and some countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia.

Travellers from Sweden, Russia and anywhere else not on the exempt list also have to obey the measures.

Ministers have repeatedly warned that the list of countries with quarantine-free travel is subject to rapid change should Covid-19 cases in these places rise – making booking any foreign holiday risky.

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Already, a growing number of countries have been moved from the exempt list to the quarantine list.

This page will keep you updated about which countries are on which list.

Countries where you must now quarantine on your return

  • Andorra
  • Aruba
  • Austria
  • The Bahamas
  • Belgium
  • Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba
  • Croatia
  • ​​Curaçao
  • The Czech Republic
  • France
  • French Polynesia
  • Guadeloupe
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Italy
  • Jamaica
  • La Réunion
  • Liechtenstein (from 4am on Sunday, October 25)
  • Luxembourg
  • Malta
  • Monaco
  • The Netherlands
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • San Marino
  • Slovakia 
  • Slovenia
  • Spain (including the Balearic Islands)
  • Switzerland
  • Turkey
  • Turks and Caicos
  • Vatican City State

Countries where you can travel quarantine-free

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Barbados
  • Brunei
  • Cuba
  • Cyprus
  • Denmark (from 4am on Sunday, October 25)
  • Dominica
  • Estonia
  • ​​​​Faroe Islands
  • Fiji
  • Finland
  • ​​​​​​Germany
  • Greece – including Greek islands (Mykonos from 4am on Sunday, October 25)
  • Greenland
  • Grenada
  • ​​​​​​Hong Kong
  • Japan
  • Latvia 
  • Lithuania
  • ​​​​​​Macau
  • Madeira and Azores
  • Malaysia
  • Maldives (from 4am on Sunday, October 25)
  • Mauritius
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Seychelles
  • Spain’s Canary Islands (from 4am on Sunday, October 25)
  • St Barthélemy
  • St Kitts & Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Pierre and Miquelon
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • South Korea
  • Sweden
  • Taiwan
  • Vietnam

What about measures in other countries?

Simply because a country is on Scotland’s exempt list does not mean you can easily go there.

A number of countries where the Scottish Government has permitted quarantine-free travel have their own strict measures in place.

  • Travellers to Australia must get an “exemption visa” to enter the country with strict criteria attached, and if they are allowed in they must quarantine for 14 days.
  • Japan has banned travellers from the UK from coming into the country.
  • Visitors to Iceland must either quarantine for 14 days or pay for a Covid-19 test on arrival. If they buy a test they must quarantine until they get a free second test five to six days later
  • New Zealand‘s border is closed to all except travellers who have a “critical purpose” in visiting the country.
  • If going to South Korea, you must take a test and do a 14-day quarantine upon arrival.

A83 Rest and Be Thankful closed overnight due expected rain

The Argyll road was shut for safety at 6pm on Saturday and will be inspected on Sunday morning with a view to reopening.

BEAR NW Trunk Roads via Twitter
Rest and Be Thankful: The road has been closed overnight.

The A83 Rest and Be Thankful will be closed overnight due to heavy rainfall expected in the area.

The key route through Argyll was shut for safety at 6pm on Saturday and will be inspected on Sunday morning with a view to reopening.

The Old Military Road local diversion route – which runs parallel to the A83 through Glen Croe – will remain open for motorists.

Eddie Ross, BEAR Scotland’s north west representative, said: “We’ve assessed the hillside and the forecast weather conditions, and given the extent of rainfall in past days we have taken the decision to close the A83 overnight as a safety precaution.

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“It is difficult for us to monitor the hillside and any sudden changes in conditions during the hours of darkness, so we’re continuing to put the safety of motorists first and will close the A83 as a precaution overnight and utilise the OMR local diversion instead.”

A geotechnical assessment will be undertaken from first light on Sunday to determine if the A83 can safely reopen.

Mr Ross added: “Further heavy rain is forecast over the coming days and we’ll be closely monitoring the weather conditions and the hillside at the Rest.

“As ever we’ll do everything we can to keep disruption to a minimum, and we thank all road users and the local community for their continued patience and understanding.”


Students protest claiming ‘mistreatment’ by university

Students from the University of Edinburgh staged a demonstration on Saturday.

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University of Edinburgh: Students held a protest on Saturday.

Students from the University of Edinburgh have staged a protest over their “mistreatment” by the institution amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Protesters claim the university made a “false promise” of hybrid learning and said that many students would not have taken out leases on flats if they had known most learning would be online.

They also claim the university’s treatment of first years has been “terrible”, saying that the university has “locked them in halls of residences with zero regard for their mental health and wellbeing”.

Students gathered to protest in the city’s Bristo Square on Saturday, calling for better treatment and services and an “actual provision of hybrid learning”, saying if the university cannot provide this then a cut in fees for the online semester is needed.

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They held placards with messages such as “9k for Zoom”, “students before profit” and “less contact same fees”.

The university said that students are receiving a hybrid learning experience, and that when they are asked to self-isolate they are provided with support.

In a Facebook post, organisers stated: “This is a protest against the University of Edinburgh’s mistreatment of students in light of the Covid-19 pandemic, mainly against the false promise of ‘hybrid learning’ made to both returning and new students.

“Students were misled and returned and started university only to find, the night before term started, that all or the vast majority of their lectures and contacts would be online.

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“Many students have taken out leases on flats that they do not need and wouldn’t have got if the university was honest and clear about online learning from the beginning.

“The treatment of new students has been terrible. The university has locked them in halls of residences with zero regard for their mental health and wellbeing.

“Many other universities across the UK have dealt with the pandemic better, with much more serious and compassionate measures being set in place to provide quality education and safety for students.

“This protest is to display our anger against and disappointment in the University of Edinburgh.”

Protesters were asked to respect social distancing and wear masks if possible.

A University of Edinburgh spokeswoman said: “Academic and support staff have been working tirelessly to provide students with the world-class education that they expect from the University of Edinburgh.

“We have been working closely with the Students’ Union and other student groups to ensure that their views are heard at the highest level.

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“Students are receiving a hybrid learning experience, in line with Scottish Government guidance, with some in-person teaching taking place on campus.

“We are delivering more than 95,000 hours of teaching this semester and more than 35,000 hours of these are scheduled to take place on campus. Our libraries and other study facilities are open, and we have created new spaces for students to meet and interact during this challenging year.

“We have also introduced new courses to help our students adjust to digital learning, as well as providing extra technical support.

“Where students are asked to self-isolate due to Scottish Government and NHS advice, we have staff working 24 hours a day to provide those in accommodation with three meals a day and have other essential items delivered. We are also providing a range of support, including daily check-ins, pastoral care and a helpline.

“We know that this is a year like no other, but we want to reassure our students that we are listening to them and acting on their feedback where we can.”


Coronavirus: 11 more dead as cases soar by 1433 overnight

The jump of 1433 is the second highest daily figure recorded in Scotland since the start of the pandemic.

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Covid-19: The fight to stop the spread of the deadly virus goes on.

A further 11 people have died in Scotland after being diagnosed with coronavirus, the Scottish Government has confirmed.

Total confirmed cases of the virus has risen to 55,449 – a jump of 1433 in the past 24 hours, which is the second highest daily figure recorded in Scotland since the start of the pandemic.

The official death toll in Scotland now stands at 2699, however weekly figures on suspected Covid-19 deaths recorded by National Records of Scotland suggest the most up-to-date total is more than 4300.

Of the new cases, 524 are in the Greater Glasgow and Clyde region, 321 are in Lanarkshire, 174 are in Ayrshire and Arran, and 166 are in Lothian.

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The remaining cases are spread across nine other health board areas.

According to management information reported by NHS boards across Scotland, 985 people are in hospital with confirmed or suspected Covid-19 – an increase of ten overnight. Out of those, 84 patients are in intensive care.

Halloween guising banned over coronavirus spread fears

The Deputy First Minister says the move is necessary to ensure current restrictions on gatherings are adhered to.

Guising: Annual tradition banned due to Covid fears.

The Scottish government has told families celebrating Halloween to avoid guising this year or risk spreading Covid-19.

Children dressing up as their favourite characters and going to door to door looking for treats has been an annual tradition for generations.

However, the Deputy First Minister says the move is necessary to ensure current restrictions on gatherings are adhered to.

In a statement released on Saturday John Swinney said: “I know guising is a big part of Halloween and children will be sad to miss out, but as door-to-door guising brings an additional and avoidable risk of spreading the virus, our clear advice for families is to avoid it.

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“Children can still get dressed up and share jokes with their families, and our Parent Club guidance has lots of fun and creative ideas for families to enjoy a safe celebration at home.

Advice on the Parent Club website suggests ways for families to have a safe Halloween at home including ideas around party games, fancy dress and storytelling.

For Bonfire Night, the advice includes guidelines around group sizes, distancing and FACTS precautions to reduce the temptation for people to hold gatherings and firework displays in their back gardens.

Swinney said: “Under the current restrictions it is not possible to meet up indoors or in large groups outdoors, so the safest thing to do this year is to stay at home.

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“On Bonfire Night it is vital the public adhere to the rules on meeting up with other households to help stop the spread of the virus.

“We know that some people may consider using fireworks in their back gardens  If you do plan on using fireworks this Bonfire Night, please do so responsibly and safely.

“Adapting alternative celebrations and sticking to the rules in place can go a huge way to ensuring everyone’s safety.”


Emergency Covid-19 cash help for ‘flagship cultural venues’

Venues like the V&A Dundee will benefit from the funding from the Scottish Government.

Hufton+Crow via V&A Dundee
V&A Dundee: The museum will benefit from emergency funding.

Emergency funding of £1m is being given to the V&A in Dundee to help it deal with the impact of coronavirus.

The move is part of a package of financial aid for “flagship cultural venues” in Scotland, with the Burrell Renaissance Project in Glasgow – which aims to revitalise the museum and safeguard its collection – being awarded £750,000.

Capital Theatres, which operates the Festival Theatre, the King’s Theatre and The Studio in Edinburgh, will receive £500,000, on top of £250,000 it has already been awarded through the Performing Arts Venue Relief Fund.

The latest funding from the Scottish Government is part of efforts to support the culture and heritage sectors, with almost £98m of emergency cash allocated so far.

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Announcing the latest cash awards, culture secretary Fiona Hyslop said: “Culture is vitally important to all of our lives, and the Scottish Government is determined to do everything within our powers to see the sector through this crisis.

“This includes providing financial support to our flagship cultural venues, as well as the work already under way to help smaller organisations and individuals within the culture sector.

“This latest funding announcement brings the Scottish Government’s total Covid-19 support package for our culture and heritage sectors to just under £98m.

“We know further support will still be needed, and the major issues presented by the pandemic are not going away, which is why we will continue to work in partnership with the sector to support them to not only survive the pandemic but to thrive in future.”

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Fiona Gibson, chief executive of Capital Theatres, said the emergency funding was “greatly appreciated” and would be a “short-term financial lifeline”.

She said: “We would very much like to thank the Scottish Government for their support and recognition, acknowledging the crucial contribution our theatres provide to the local, national and cultural sector economies. This will enable us to continue supporting our core staff, freelancers and communities alike.”


Visiting restrictions to come into force at three hospitals

NHS Tayside has put restrictions in place at Perth Royal Infirmary, Ninewells Hospital and Strathcaro Hospital.

© Google Maps 2020
Perth Royal Infirmary: Visiting restrictions will come into force on Monday.

New visiting restrictions will come into force at three hospitals across Tayside on Monday.

The health board said its clinical and public health teams made the “difficult decision” in order to curb the spread of coronavirus and protect vulnerable patients.

All wards at Perth Royal Infirmary will be restricted to visitors, along with all adult wards at Ninewells Hospital in Dundee. The surgical unit wards at Strathcaro Hospital near Brechin have also been restricted.

Claire Pearce, NHS Tayside’s director of nursing and midwifery, said: “We understand that suspending visiting will impact on families and patients and we know that not being able to visit family members whilst they are in hospital is distressing for many people. 

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“However it is vital that we keep our patients, staff and the public safe. We hope everyone understands that we have made this difficult decision for these reasons.”  

Four wards across Tayside already have restricted visiting due to outbreaks of Covid-19.

The health board said the virus is “circulating widely in the community”, with the current incidence rate within Dundee higher than some of the local authorities in the central belt that are under enhanced restrictions.

NHS Tayside said there are almost 50 patients with confirmed coronavirus in its hospitals, along with a number of suspected cases.

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Despite the restrictions, visiting can continue in specific circumstances, for example for patients receiving end-of-life care. 

The public can continue to visit:

  • Tayside Children’s Hospital.
  • Maternity and neonatal wards. Partners can continue to attend for births, scans and antenatal appointments.
  • Mental health facilities, including Carseview Centre.
  • Community hospitals.

Anyone with a question about visiting should contact the senior charge nurse in the ward to discuss their individual situation.  

Ms Pearce added: “In order to manage the number of patients with the virus, we are using our three acute hospitals flexibly with patients and staff moving between the sites. 

“This means that we must restrict visiting in all three sites to help further reduce the number of people coming into our hospitals each day and help limit the spread of coronavirus. 

“We will continue to offer virtual visiting for patients using telephones, tablets and laptops to allow people to keep in touch with their loved ones.” 

Eric Audras via Getty Images
Hospital: The fight to stop the spread of the deadly virus goes on.

Meanwhile, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) is calling on the public to heed current guidelines to minimise the number of new hospital admissions following a surge in coronavirus case numbers.

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There are currently more than 500 patients in hospital across the region with the virus.

The health board has now implemented red, amber and green patient pathways across its sites to separate Covid from non-Covid patients to minimise the spread of the virus.

There are currently 20 red wards which are exclusively treating patients with Covid-19. 

Dr Scott Davidson, deputy medical director for acute services at NHSGGC, said: “Numbers are continuing to rise across Scotland, and Greater Glasgow and Clyde has been the worst affected region in the country. 

“It is absolutely critical the public follows the guidelines to ensure that our staff are able to continue effectively managing and treating both Covid and non-Covid patients.

“During this time we are maintaining a programme of elective surgery but this also means that we are currently looking after more patients than ever before, so while the numbers of Covid-19 patients may not yet have reached March’s peak levels, there is as much pressure on our staff across services.

“We would like to remind the public of the current policies in relation to using health services, as minimising unnecessary footfall plays a huge role in preventing the spread of the virus, and allows our staff to focus on delivering the best care possible.”

Health service guidance

  • Attend hospital appointments alone unless you fall into one of the specific support categories
  • Please only use emergency departments in an emergency.
  • Community assessment centres are there to provide support to those with Covid-19 symptoms.
  • Community health practices and pharmacies are still available alongside out-of-hours services, which you can access by calling 111.

FACTS guidance:

F – Face coverings. These should be used in shops and on public transport.

A – Avoid crowded places.

C – Clean your hands frequently, using water and soap whenever possible.

T – Two metres – observe physical distancing.

S – Self-isolate and book a test if you are suffering from Covid-19 symptoms.

For more information, click here.

 


Scotland ‘on track’ to hit 65,000 coronavirus tests per day

A Lighthouse lab director denies capacity issues as three new regional hubs prepare to open across the country.

STV News

A review of Scotland’s testing strategy says the country is “on track” to hit 65,000 tests per day.

Three new regional hubs are to open in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Aberdeen, increasing capacity by 22,000 tests a day for NHS Scotland.

The hubs will be located at Gartnavel Hospital in Glasgow, Lauriston Place in Edinburgh and Foresterhill in Aberdeen – all sites previously occupied by the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service.

Chief nursing officer professor Fiona McQueen said: “NHS Scotland’s Test and Protect system is performing well, even with rising cases and the country is on track to expand overall testing capacity to 65,000 tests per day by winter.

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“However, while the full extent of the pandemic in Scotland over the winter months is currently unknown, it is crucial that there is a greater focus on reducing test turnaround times so that we can further reduce transmission by enabling timely contact tracing and isolation of close contacts. Initiatives such as the additional NHS Scotland regional labs will go some way towards this.”

The NHS hubs are in addition to an increase in UK Government-run testing being carried out at the Lighthouse lab, part of a network of diagnostic testing facilities at Lighthouse sites around the UK.

The Glasgow facility is hosted by the University of Glasgow at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital campus, and it currently processes around 50,000 tests a day from across the UK though primarily from Scotland.

The director of the Lighthouse laboratory says there are no issues with coronavirus testing capacity and insists staff are ready to deal with any winter challenges.

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Scottish ministers had blamed Sunday’s late coronavirus cases report on capacity issues at the UK Government’s Lighthouse lab, but the UK Government denied there were any testing capacity problems and described the allegations as “categorically untrue”.

Carol Clugston, director of the laboratory where around 500 people work, said: “We don’t have problems with capacity, what we do is we report what our capacity is week to week so currently our capacity is about 50,000 tests per day.

“Across the UK network there are logistic teams that actually make sure the tests that we get sent to us are in line with our capacity so that we don’t get more than we can process or that we don’t get less, that we have unused capacity.

“Generally that works very well. It is a very complex system, we’re not involved in that but generally it works well.”

The Lighthouse laboratory has processed three million tests since it came online in April, when it was processing just around 40 tests a day.

There are plans to increase capacity to 85,000 tests a day in the coming weeks and the laboratory is recruiting staff to enable it to do so.

Edinburgh Woollen Mill granted extension to help avoid collapse

The clothing chain, which also owns Peacocks and Jaeger, has been granted ten working days to speak to potential buyers.

Jeff J Mitchell via Getty Images
Edinburgh Woollen Mill: The high street chain is on the brink of collapse.

High street clothing chain Edinburgh Woollen Mill, which also owns Peacocks and Jaeger, has been granted a further ten working days to speak to potential buyers and work on a rescue plan.

The retailer said earlier this month that it would go bust without filing for an intention to appoint administrators with the High Court, with 24,000 jobs in the balance.

Since then, bosses have started closing 50 stores with 600 job losses, while they work through securing backing for the rest of the business.

According to a memo, there is interest in parts of the business, understood to be the Peacocks and Jaeger brands.

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However, it is understood a further 100 to 150 stores across the group are being earmarked for closure while talks continue with landlords.

Discussions on the sale of the Peacocks brand were also hit by lockdown restrictions in Wales, with the company’s headquarters and distribution centre based in Cardiff.

Bosses wrote to staff on Friday morning, warning them that the national and local lockdowns had hit sales very heavily.

In a note written to staff, the company said it had been a challenging time and thanked workers for their efforts.

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It said: “Two weeks ago we wrote to you to say that we had applied to the High Court to protect the group from creditors for a short time, while we worked on a longer term plan to rescue as much of it as possible from the devastating effects of Covid-19 and the lockdowns.

“Since then we have been working on that plan and have made good progress, but it is a complex and difficult process.

“We are speaking to a number of parties who are interested in either buying parts of the business or offering investment.

“What is clear is that this process will mean a lot of change for all of us and inevitably a significant number of store closures.

“We are pleased to say though that today the High Court has agreed to extend the breathing space for another two weeks to give us more time to work on the details and further pursue these opportunities.

“We will use this time as best we can to protect the businesses and save jobs.”


At a glance: Scotland’s new coronavirus levels system

The Scottish Government's new strategic framework for tackling the spread of Covid-19 has five tiers.

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First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has outlined a new system for dealing with coronavirus.

It involves five levels, zero to four, and will come into effect on November 2, pending parliamentary approval of the framework on Tuesday.

Sturgeon said on Friday the central belt is currently living with the equivalent of level three restrictions in the new system and the rest of the country is living with restrictions that are the equivalent of level two.

The FM also said a final decision on where each local authority area will be placed in the new framework has not yet been made.

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Level zero will represent the closest to normal the country can get without effective treatment or a vaccine, whereas level four will be much closer to the full lockdown restrictions seen from the end of March.

The Scottish Government framework can be viewed here and at a glance below:

LEVEL ZERO:

Socialising – Eight people from three households can meet indoors. Fifteen people from five households can meet outdoors.

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Hospitality – Pubs, restaurants and cafes are open and can sell alcohol indoors and outdoors. But restrictions on opening hours may apply.

Accommodation – Hotels, B&Bs and self-catering accommodation such as caravans and campsites are permitted to open.

Travel – No non-essential travel to/from areas of Scotland that are in level three or higher. International quarantine regulations apply.

Transport – Avoid car sharing with people outside extended household wherever possible. Face masks on public transport.

Retail and close contact services – Shops and close contact services – such as hairdressers, barbers, tailors and beauticians are open.

Public buildings – Buildings such as libraries and museums are open.

Stadia and events – Outdoor events are permitted and spectators allowed in football stadiums with restricted numbers. Indoor events can go ahead with restricted numbers.

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Weddings, civil partnerships and funerals – All allowed but with a 50 person limit.

Places of worship – Open but restricted to 50 people.

Leisure and Entertainment – Open with the exception of adult entertainment and nightclubs.

Workplaces – Open but working from home is the default option.

Schools – Open with standard protective measures in place.

LEVEL ONE:

Socialising – Six people from two households can meet indoors and outdoors.

Hospitality – Pubs, restaurants and cafes are open and can sell alcohol indoors and outdoors. But restrictions on opening hours may apply.

Accommodation – Hotels, B&Bs and self-catering accommodation such as caravans and campsites are permitted to open.

Travel – No non-essential travel to/from areas of Scotland that are in level three or higher. International quarantine regulations apply.

Transport – Avoid car sharing with people outside extended household wherever possible. Face masks on public transport.

Retail and close contact services – Shops and close contact services – such as hairdressers, barbers, tailors and beauticians are open.

Public buildings – Buildings such as libraries and museums are open.

Stadia and events – Outdoor events are permitted and spectators allowed in football stadiums with restricted numbers. Indoor events can go ahead with restricted numbers.

Weddings, civil partnerships and funerals – All allowed but with a 20 person limit.

Places of worship – Open but restricted to 50 people.

Leisure and Entertainment – Open with the exception of adult entertainment and nightclubs.

Workplaces – Open but working from home is the default option.

Schools – Open with standard protective measures in place.

LEVEL TWO:

Socialising – People cannot socialise indoors with another household. Six people from two households can meet outdoors and in hospitality settings.

Hospitality – Pubs, restaurants and cafes are open. Alcohol can be sold outdoors but only with a main meal indoors. Restrictions on opening hours may apply.

Accommodation – Hotels, B&Bs and self-catering accommodation such as caravans and campsites are permitted to open. Level 2 hospitality rules apply.

Travel – No non-essential travel to/from areas of Scotland that are in level three or higher. International quarantine regulations apply.

Transport – Avoid car sharing with people outside extended household wherever possible. Face masks on public transport.

Retail and close contact services – Shops and close contact services – such as hairdressers, barbers, tailors and beauticians – open but mobile close contact services not permitted.

Public buildings – Buildings such as libraries and museums are open with protective measures in place.

Stadia and events – Only drive-in events permitted. Stadiums closed to spectators.

Weddings, civil partnerships and funerals – All allowed but with a 20 person limit.

Places of worship – Open but restricted to 50 people.

Leisure and Entertainment – Cinemas and amusement arcades can open. The following venues must close: soft play, funfairs, indoor bowling, theatres, snooker/pool halls, music venues, casinos, bingo halls, nightclubs and adult entertainment

Workplaces – Open but working from home is the default option.

Schools – Open with standard protective measures in place.

LEVEL THREE:

Socialising – People cannot socialise indoors. Six people from two households can meet outdoors and in hospitality settings.

Hospitality – Pubs, restaurants and cafes cannot sell alcohol indoors or outdoors. Restrictions on opening hours for eating out may apply.

Accommodation – Hotels, B&Bs and self-catering accommodation such as caravans and campsites are permitted to open. The guidance encourages non-essential use by locals only – not for tourists.

Travel – No non-essential travel into our out of the level three area. International quarantine regulations apply.

Transport – Avoid car sharing with people outside extended household wherever possible. Avoid non-essential use of public transport. Face coverings compulsory.

Retail and close contact services – Shops and close contact services – such as hairdressers, barbers, tailors and beauticians are open but may be subject to additional measures. Mobile close contact services not permitted.

Public buildings – Buildings such as libraries and museums are open with protective measures in place.

Stadia and events – No indoor or outdoor events permitted. Stadiums closed to spectators.

Weddings, civil partnerships and funerals – All allowed but with a 20 person limit.

Places of worship – Open but restricted to 50 people.

Leisure and Entertainment – All venues closed.

Workplaces – Open but working from home is the default option.

Schools – Open with standard protective measures in place.

LEVEL FOUR:

Socialising – People cannot socialise indoors. Six people from two households can meet outdoors.

Hospitality – Pubs, restaurants and cafes must close.

Accommodation – Hotels, B&Bs and self-catering accommodation not open for tourists. Work-related essential use only.

Travel – No non-essential travel into or out of the level 4 area. If necessary, limits on travel distance, or a requirement to stay at home.

Transport – Avoid car sharing with people outside extended household wherever possible. No use of public transport, except for essential purposes. Face coverings compulsory

Retail and close contact services – Shops and close contact services – such as hairdressers, barbers, tailors and beauticians – must close. Mobile close contact services not permitted

Public buildings – Buildings such as libraries and museums are closed.

Stadia and events – No indoor or outdoor events permitted. Stadiums closed to spectators.

Weddings, civil partnerships and funerals – A maximum of five people allowed at weddings (six where an interpreter is required). Funerals and wakes subject to 20 person limit.

Places of worship – Open but restricted to 20 people.

Leisure and Entertainment – All venues closed.

Workplaces – Only essential indoor workplaces can open along with outdoor workplaces in sectors such as construction and engineering.

Schools – Open with standard protective measures in place.

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