Artist ‘buzzing’ to open paper cave to public after lockdown

Laura McGlinchey was unable to showcase her impressive artwork in 2020 due to the Covid restrictions put in place.

Laura McGlinchey via Email

An artist whose big exhibition plans were scuppered by the coronavirus pandemic last year is “absolutely buzzing” as she gets ready to welcome the public into her phenomenal paper cave.

Laura McGlinchey was unable to showcase her impressive artwork in 2020 due to the Covid restrictions put in place, but has now recreated the installation for public display.

McGlinchey, from South Ayrshire, told STV news: “I am absolutely buzzing for paper cave round two. 

“I feel incredibly lucky to have, once again, been given the space, time and encouragement to make this large installation. Especially during this global pandemic where the whole world has had to just stop.”

Laura McGlinchey via Email
Impressive: Laura McGlinchey has built another paper cave.
ADVERT

As reported by STV News previously, the project was initially commissioned by Look Again, a creative unit based at Gray’s School of Art in Aberdeen.

The installation was originally set to take place in Aberdeen last May, but was moved online.

McGlinchey, who has a compulsion to blur creative boundaries, stormed on and built the paper cave within The Pipe Factory in Glasgow last autumn.

She then invited 13 different acts – from musicians and comedians to poets and performance artists – to perform over two days. The shows were recorded and released online.

Laura McGlinchey via Email
Artwork: The exhibition will adhere to coronavirus restrictions.
ADVERT

This time round McGlinchey has recreated the installation at Dough, a newly developing gallery space run by arts initiative Narture in Ayr’s Sandgate.

McGlinchey said: “I was brought up in Loans and went to school in Troon but Ayr is where I used to go as a young teen.

“I’ve got lots of pals from Ayr and lots of fond memories of hanging out, going shopping or to the cinema.

“There used to be a lot of gigs in Ayr too, all-dayers, and a lot of wild nights out. I think the first gig I ever went to was in Ayr, at The Gaiety Theatre to see The Beat.

“I’ve been in contact with Robert and Saskia, father and daughter, who set up and run Narture for about seven years now and have done a couple of exhibitions with them in Ayr through the years.

“They are very encouraging and supportive of artists being able to support themselves while making their work.

“I made a proposal to them for a residency/exhibition and they agreed to commission it. We have been working together to realise the project to its fullest potential.

ADVERT

“I will be there for six weeks in total. I’ve had a great time so far. We eat together daily, discuss our days and plan for the future. A truly nurturing experience.”

Laura McGlinchey via Email
Dough: The large windows will help to boost community engagement.

McGlinchey’s main objective with the paper cave installation is to encourage community engagement.

She said: “The large windows of the venue are key to this as it allows the public in, making for a more ‘access all areas’ insight of the work, and importantly, the process that you typically don’t get in a traditional white cube gallery.

“The idea is that the local community can build up a relationship to the work, seeing it on their daily commute and to the wider public following the progress online.”

McGlinchey uses everyday materials – including string, paper, plastic waste and flour and water – to highlight that art is accessible to all.

She added: “We can use what is around us to get to where we need.

“Being resourceful is key and you don’t need to spend lots of money on materials to produce work that can identify as contemporary fine art. A largely wasteful, consumer-driven society means that there is an abundance of free materials and information available.”

Laura McGlinchey via Email
Colourful: Painting is at the core of McGlinchey’s practice.

Although painting is at the core of McGlinchey’s practice, she has a compulsion to blur the boundaries between painting, performance, sculpture, installation and craft.

When creating the first paper cave, she shredded and painted gig posters that were printed for the year ahead but due to Covid-19 no longer had any use.

Speaking about the new installation, she said: “I am using a lot of parts from the previous cave and pieces of much older works I’ve had in storage, along with materials gathered from the local area and some even given by the community.

“Working in this way means that I can get the installation built up quite quickly so that I will have time left to engage the public and local community as much as possible.

“This exhibition will take on the form of an installation made from materials found and collected from the local area – paper, cardboard, plastic. The installation will cover the walls and ceiling of the whole space, creating a cave-like environment.”

McGlinchey will also host another series of performances within the cave.

Quiche, Grayling, Jenny Clifford, Shredd, Adult Fun, Scarlett Randle and Craig John Davidson make up the bill this time round.

Again, there will be no audience, but the sets will be uploaded online.

McGlinchey said: “Unfortunately the sessions will be shown digitally and have no live audience.

“However, with restrictions slightly eased since last August bands have been able to practice together again.

“When booking the acts for the last cave, it dawned on me that it would be very difficult to get a full band that was able to have practiced together at all for months and months.

“So, this time around I was keen to get a few bands together as well as some solo and duet performances.

“We are getting closer to live performances with an audience and I just can’t wait.

“I would really relish the chance to host gigs in the cave with an actual audience.”

McGlinchey’s paper cave exhibition will take place between May 28 and June 14 at Dough, 22 Sandgate, Ayr.

Covid restrictions will be in place and strictly followed.

For more information, click here or follow McGlinchey on Instagram.


Campaigners march in Glasgow calling for venues to reopen

Hundreds attended a march, organised by activist group Communities Unite Against Closures, in the city centre on Saturday afternoon.

STV News

Campaigners have taken to the streets of Glasgow to urge the reopening of ‘vital’ public services in the city.

Hundreds attended a march, organised by activist group Communities Unite Against Closures, in the city centre on Saturday afternoon.

They are calling for services, including libraries, museums and sports facilities, to be reopened to the community, with several facing threat of indefinite closure.

Banners saying Save Whiteinch Library, Don’t Axe Our Venues and Friends of People’s Palace could be seen among others at the march that started at Cathedral Square and walked from the closed St Mungo Museum to the People’s Palace. 

ADVERT

A spokesperson for CUAC said the city’s heritage has been “ravaged”.

A statement posted on the event’s Facebook page said: “These services are not a luxury, they are at the heart of any cohesive community.

“Our community assets should not be regarded as a cost to the public purse but an investment in the health and wellbeing of our community for generations to come.”

Glasgow Life say its ability to open more venues is “entirely dependent on more funding becoming available” from the city council.

ADVERT

A spokesperson for Glasgow Life said: “The £100m funding guarantee we received from Glasgow City Council in March has been fully allocated, reopening more than 90 venues across the city in the wake of the global pandemic.

“In May, Glasgow City Council passed a motion resolving that all Glasgow Life venues should reopen as soon as funding and Scottish Government guidance allows but Glasgow Life’s ability to open more venues is entirely dependent on more funding becoming available.

“Unions have been kept up to date with plans for reopening over the last year and the ongoing impact the pandemic would have on Glasgow Life and assessments of the possible impact were published and widely reported in March this year.

“We recognise the strength of feeling there is about venues without reopening dates and, continue to make the case for further income which would allow us to open more.”


Coronavirus: Nine more deaths and 1018 fresh cases reported

A total of 445 people were in hospital on Friday with recently confirmed Covid-19.

Luza studios via IStock
Covid-19: The fight to stem the spread of the deadly virus goes on.

A further nine deaths and 1018 new cases of coronavirus have been recorded in Scotland overnight, according to official figures.

The daily test positivity rate is 4.9%, down from the 6.2% reported on Friday.

Of the new cases reported on Saturday, 236 are in the Greater Glasgow and Clyde region, 192 are in Lothian, 174 are in Lanarkshire, and 82 are in Fife.

The rest of the cases are spread out across nine other health board areas.

ADVERT

A total of 445 people were in hospital on Friday with recently confirmed Covid-19, 29 fewer than the day before. Out of those, 64 patients are in intensive care.

The lab-confirmed death toll of those who tested positive within the previous 28 days currently stands at 7939, however figures including suspected Covid-19 deaths recorded by National Records of Scotland suggest the most up-to-date total is now at least 10,324.

It was also confirmed that 4,009,611 Scots have received their first dose of a Covid-19 vaccine, an increase of 2034 from the day before.

A total of 3,180,160 people have received their second dose, a rise of 17,498.


Scot Kathleen Dawson helps Team GB win gold medal at Olympics

The quartet set a world record time in a gripping final of the inaugural mixed 4×100m medley relay.

PA Images via PA Media
Champs: Great Britain's Kathleen Dawson, Adam Peaty, James Guy and Anna Hopkin with their gold medals.

Scotland’s Kathleen Dawson has helped Team GB secure gold in the 4x100m mixed relay at the Olympic Games.

Adam Peaty later revealed Great Britain’s resurgence in the pool is down to tireless commitment behind the scenes after the team equalled their best-ever swimming medal haul at an Olympics.

Peaty and James Guy bagged their second golds of Tokyo 2020 and Dawson and Anna Hopkin their first, as the Team GB quartet set a world record time in a gripping final of the inaugural mixed 4×100m medley relay.

Britain were therefore left celebrating their fourth gold of these Games, to go with two silvers and one bronze, matching the exact haul they achieved 113 years ago in London, and there is the prospect of more to come on Sunday.

ADVERT

Their achievements represent a massive turnaround from when British Swimming’s funding was slashed after a failure to win a race at London 2012, and Peaty insisted assiduity and diligence has been at the core of their revival.

“I hope this team and the rest of British Swimming get the recognition and the respect that they deserve because it’s been f*****g hard,” said Peaty, who retained his men’s 100m breaststroke title earlier this week.

“It’s the only way to get the emotion across. Honestly people don’t understand how hard it is. Hopefully people back home can understand that.

“I’ve been doing this for seven years since 2014 and I didn’t think the team would be where they are today. You’ve got such amazing talent. It’s just incredible to be part of that and hopefully people back home are pretty pumped.”

ADVERT

Peaty will be eyeing a fourth Olympic gold and third in Japan this week in the men’s 4x100m medley relay final on Sunday, but he feared the worst on Saturday morning after thinking Guy had jumped in too early at their handover.

Britain jumped from sixth to fourth at the halfway stage after Peaty’s incredible breaststroke split of 56.78 seconds before Guy catapulted them to top spot with an equally astonishing time of exactly 50secs in the butterfly.

But Guy himself worried he had set off a fraction earlier and did not allow himself to get carried away with the celebrations until he knew he would not get disqualified.

“I was just panicking and panicking. I thought I went early. I was like ‘oh no’,” said Guy, with Peaty adding: “I saw his feet leave and I was like ‘you f*****g idiot’.”

Guy added: “As soon as I dived in I’m thinking ‘I’ve gone too early, I’ve screwed it up, I’m going to get a DQ, but you know, it’s too late now, just go for it’. Afterwards I was just waiting and just saying ‘please, please, please, please’.”

This event has been added to the Olympics schedule for the first time – where two males and two females must be selected but the nation can use any combination in the backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly and freestyle splits.

Dawson, from Kirkcaldy in Fife, did not get off to an auspicious starts after slipping in her push off the wall in a leg where she was up against four males, including the 100m and 200m backstroke winner Evgeny Rylov of the Russian Olympic Committee.

ADVERT

“I had a little bit of an issue,” said the Scot. “I couldn’t quite feel my hands. Somehow I slipped going in.

“I wasn’t quite sure what I did when I did it. I think I managed to keep calm and after that it was about focusing to try and get the best performance I could out of myself.”

Britain were six seconds off the pace when Peaty dove in but the 26-year-old from Uttoxeter and Guy helped their nation into a lead of six tenths of a second as Hopkin anchored their race in the freestyle.

Hopkin came into the race knowing she would go head-to-head against the men’s 100m freestyle champion Caeleb Dressel but the American was well back as Britain touched out in three minutes and 37.58 seconds.

“It’s pretty cool to say I’ve beaten Caeleb Dressel,” joked Hopkin.

“To know that he was coming for me, it’s a little bit intimidating. But I knew that the guys ahead of me would get me a good lead.

“And then it was just about me focusing on my own race and keeping my head down, not worrying about where he was. Because that would just distract me, and stay focused on my lane and bring it home for the guys.”

China took silver, finishing 1.28 seconds behind the winners, while Australia collected bronze as the United States settled for fifth.

Elsewhere, Ben Proud qualified for the men’s 50m freestyle final on Sunday, the final day of swimming at the Games.

Commenting on Dawson’s win, Mike Whittingham, director of high performance at sportscotland, said: “Team GB’s performances in the pool at the Tokyo Games have been nothing short of incredible and to see Scottish swimmers at the heart of that success is fantastic.

“Huge congratulations to Kathleen on a well-deserved gold medal and also to her coach, her support team and everyone at Scottish Swimming.

“They have all worked so hard for this moment, which highlights the strength of the sport at all levels here in Scotland. But today is all about Kathleen, she deserves all the plaudits and praise coming her way.”  


What to expect from the 12 Premiership clubs this season

The Premiership gets under way this weekend with hopes high a vintage season could lie ahead.

Craig Williamson via SNS Group
The battle for the Premiership title begins this weekend.

The friendlies have finished, the League Cup is on the back burner and the European competitions can be forgotten this weekend – the Premiership is back.

After the strangest season in history, fans are looking for a return to normality, insofar as Scottish football is ever normal.

The numbers may not be at the levels anyone wants yet, but there will be supporters in every stadium on the opening weekend, and they’ll all have hopes and expectations.

The promotion of Hearts and Dundee brings back a couple of city derbies, and clubs across the league have been strengthening.

ADVERT

We’ve looked at each side and how they are prepared for the challenges ahead.

Aberdeen

Jay Emanuel-Thomas and Christian Ramirez make up a new-look Aberdeen attack. (Photo by Craig Foy / SNS Group)

Stephen Glass may have taken charge towards the end of last season, but this summer feels like the start of something new at Pittodrie. Scott Brown has joined as player-coach, along with a handful of exciting new signings.

The first major test was encouraging, with a 5-1 demolition of Hacken thrilling fans, but there’s a big challenge ahead to finish high in the Premiership and compete for silverware. Last season brought a fourth-place finish and a points tally closer to the bottom than the top.

ADVERT

Improvement is expected and excitement around the club is high.

Celtic

Paul Devlin via SNS Group
Ange Postecoglou has taken on the job of revamping and reviving Celtic’s squad. (Photo by Paul Devlin / SNS Group)

After their domestic dominance ended in spectacular fashion, Celtic start this campaign under a new manager; Ange Postecoglou has vowed to deliver attacking, entertaining football.

He’ll attempt to do so with a new-look squad. Five players have been added and many more are needed as they attempt to mount a title challenge. Kristoffer Ajer – a mainstay in the defence – has gone and striker Odsonne Eduoard is set to follow suit.

A big turnaround of players will present challenges, not least how quickly they settle and gel. The club’s elimination from the Champions League has already put them behind the eight ball.

Supporters’ anger following the defeat to Midtylland is directed towards the board, not Postecogolou, who at his first media conferences warned he needed new signings ‘’yesterday’’.

Unless the Australian gets the backing he needs to win trophies, this could be another long season for the Celtic faithful.

ADVERT

Dundee

Dundee’s attack will be vital to their survival hopes. (Photo by Ross Parker / SNS Group)

James McPake’s side earned their Premiership place the hard way, coming through the play-offs after a testing Championship season, and they’ll find no respite on their return to the top flight.

The core of last season’s team remains, with Charlie Adam’s experience and skill a hugely valuable asset. Cillian Sheridan and Luke McCowan have arrived to offer new options in an attack that already features Jason Cummings.

The return of derbies against United will be a welcome addition to the calendar, but in the bigger picture, Dundee’s main task is to steer clear of the drop zone.

Local bragging rights are a bonus.

Dundee United

Dundee United have put their faith in Tam Courts (Photo by Paul Devlin / SNS Group)

United were a year ahead of their city neighbours in returning to the top division and made a decent fist of re-establishing themselves with a ninth-place finish.

Regardless, the club made a big change, allowing manager Micky Mellon to return to Tranmere and promoting Tam Courts from within. Courts will be expected to showcase the young talent the club has traditionally produced, and deliver attacking football while climbing the table. It’s no small task.

There hasn’t been much in the way of recruitment, but Charlie Mulgrew has returned and his know-how could be crucial. A flawless record in the League Cup group stage was an encouraging start for Courts and the new project, but the pressure could be on if a difficult-looking start sees the team fail to deliver points.

Hearts

Hearts have made a strong start in the League Cup. (Photo by Ross Parker / SNS Group)

Hearts did exactly what was required of them last season, lifting the Championship trophy to ensure their controversial exit from the Premiership lasted just one season. The Tynecastle club returns with greater ambition than just staying up.

Any notion that manager Robbie Neilson came out of promotion as a conquering hero should be set aside, though. Cup exits to Alloa and Brora last year brought anger from fans, and the team’s performances at times throughout the league season means he faces a job to win around the support.

Neilson hasn’t added extensively to his squad, yet, but the team that came up has plenty of top-level experience and doesn’t lack for leadership. The League Cup has provided a smooth warm-up, with four wins from four, but two games against Celtic and a match against Aberdeen before the end of August mean that Hearts fans will have a clearer idea of their side’s prospects sooner rather than later.

Hibernian

Hibs hope to juggle European football with domestic competition. (Photo by Ross Parker / SNS Group)

League Cup semi-finalists, Scottish Cup finalists and third in the Premiership last season. On paper it’s a successful season, but the Hibs faithful feel opportunities were missed.

This time around, Jack Ross has the unenviable task of delivering progress on what’s already a reasonably high bar. The manager started his recruitment early, landing Daniel MacKay from Inverness, made Jamie Murphy’s move from Rangers permanent and added Jake Doyle-Hayes from St Mirren.

There will be further additions, most likely, but Hibs’ hopes may also hinge on whether there are departures. Interest in Ryan Porteous and Kevin Nisbet was rebuffed last season and with a new chief executive in place, Hibs aim to build on what they have. That ambition could be tested, especially if progress in Europe means a juggling of priorities.

Livingston

Rob Casey via SNS Group
David Martindale hopes to mastermind another impressive league campaign. (Photo by Rob Casey / SNS Group)

From the point David Martindale stepped into the manager’s job last season, it quickly became a memorable one for the Livi fans. A long, long unbeaten run helped the team to a top-six finish and the League Cup final.

Now, the work is on to match or better what surprised most of Scottish football last term. Ten new faces have arrived, including Andrew Shinnie and Bruce Anderson, but just as many have left the club. Martindale will have to hope the new signings click if they are to avoid taking a step backwards.

The fixture list has already given Livi a tough task in the early weeks, with matches against last season’s top four within the first six games.

Motherwell

Bruce White via SNS Group
Graham Alexander will look to deliver an improvement on last season. (Photo by Bruce White / SNS Group)

For the club that finished third in the shortened 2019-20 season, last term was a depressing drop in standards for the Steelmen.

Now Graham Alexander has had a transfer window and a pre-season to put his mark on the squad. Declan Gallagher and Devante Cole are among the departures and leave huge shoes to fill, but Alexander has made nine signings, including the impressive Liam Kelly on a permanent deal. Dutch striker Kevin van Veen worked with the manager before, suggesting he’s far from a gamble.

The side came through the League Cup group stages with nine points, but narrow wins over Queen’s Park and Queen of the South, as well as a surprise 2-0 loss to Airdrie, indicate that Motherwell are far from flying.

Rangers

Alan Harvey via SNS Group
Rangers have strengthened as they aim to defend their title. (Photo by Alan Harvey / SNS Group)

After steering Rangers to their first title in ten years, Steven Gerrard is hungry for more success. And supporters want more, too. Unsurprisingly, they are odds-on favourites with the bookies to win the Premiership, but success in the cups will also be a target. By Gerrard’s own admission, one trophy out of nine under his watch is ”not good enough”.  

The big and early test comes in Europe. They must successfully negotiate two qualifying rounds to reach the lucrative group stage of the Champions League, something the club last achieved a decade ago.

The signing of Fashion Sakala looks a tidy bit of business, as does the capture of John Lundstram. Departures? Alfredo Morelos’ future is again a hot topic. In a recent interview, the Rangers manager was unable to answer if the striker would be at the club this season. Glen Kamara may have caught the eye of potential suitors after impressing for Finland at the Euros.

With [just over] a month to go before the transfer window closes, speculation over players’ futures will no doubt continue.

Ross County

County have turned to Malky Mackay to lead the team this season. (Photo by Paul Devlin / SNS Group)

While Rangers are odds-on to win the league, Ross County are the shortest price to finish bottom and it’s easy to see why. John Hughes steered the club to a narrow escape from the drop last year, but promptly left to seek new challenges, leaving the club to lick its wounds.

Enter Malky Mackay, a controversial choice given his past, but also a manager with extensive experience.

Mackay has brought in players, including Ross Callachan from Hamilton, and stated an intent to make an impression on the league, but County look the least well-equipped at this stage and face an uphill struggle. Late signings may make a difference, but a relegation battle looks inevitable.

St Johnstone

Rob Casey via SNS Group
St Johnstone had a season to remember in 2020/21. (Photo by Rob Casey / SNS Group)

What constitutes success for St Johnstone this season after the incredible heroics that saw them win both cups and finish fifth in the league?

Ever the pragmatist, Callum Davidson’s first aim will be to stay in the Premiership, but the team that played with such assurance last year should have no worries on that score and will make a top-six place a more realistic target. Beyond that, it may be down to how many of the core of that side are prised away before the window closes – and how they are replaced.

On-loan centre-back Hayden Muller looks capable of maintaining Saints’ defensive solidity, while left-back Reece Devine joined from Manchester United for the season and looks to be another shrewd addition

On paper, another solid season, with the capability for another cup run or two, looks in the offing, with the added excitement and demands of European football, where an intriguing tie against Galatasaray will result in either Europa League progress or a Conference League play-off place.

Davidson showed last season he could squeeze the maximum out of a small squad with discipline, attitude and belief, as well as no little talent. Pulling off a repeat with league expectations, defence of two trophies and continental competition would add to his rapidly growing reputation.

St Mirren

Mark Scates via SNS Group
Jim Goodwin believes he can make St Mirren a top-six team. (Photo by Mark Scates / SNS Group)

After falling short of their publicly stated top-six ambition by the finest of margins, Jim Goodwin and his side are setting out with exactly the same target this time around.

The buzz around St Mirren following the completion of the supporters’ buy-out adds another positive in Paisley and hopes will be high that the new era can start off with success.

So far, Saints have held on to the stars of last season, and made it clear that anyone coming for Jamie McGrath will be paying a good price, and paying early enough that a quality replacement can be found. It’s not just about the goal-scoring midfielder, though, a dependable defence remains together for now and the club’s young talents like Ethan Erhahon and Jay Henderson will only get better.

Goodwin has also added wisely, bringing in players with experience of the league. Greg Kiltie and Alan Power joined from relegated Kilmarnock, while Charles Dunne arrived from Motherwell and Curtis Main has bolstered the attack.

Last season showed real progress from a club that had been accustomed to a relegation battle and, even given the increased competition in the league, Goodwin and his players will be focused on taking that next step and a top-half finish.


Street locked down after man found seriously injured

Emergency services were alerted to the incident in Paisley’s Shuttle Street late on Friday night.

Sean Lowe via Email
Paisley: Officers taped off the street.

Police have launched an investigation after a man was found seriously injured in a Renfrewshire street.

Emergency services were alerted to the incident in Paisley’s Shuttle Street late on Friday night.

A 37-year-old man was taken to the town’s Royal Alexandra Hospital for treatment.

The street was taped off for investigation works, with officers pictured still at the scene shortly after 6am on Saturday morning.

ADVERT

A Police Scotland spokesperson said: “We received a report of a 37-year-old man found seriously injured in Shuttle Street, Paisley, around 11.50pm on Friday.

“Officers attended and he was taken to Royal Alexandra Hospital for treatment.

“Enquiries to establish the full circumstances are ongoing and anyone with information is asked to contact police on 101.”


In pictures: Giant colourful hares on the loose

Art sculptures raise money for charity which helps people with neurological conditions.

STV News

Ten giant colourful hares are on the loose in East Lothian – but there’s no need to call for help.

They’re all part of an art sculpture trail dotted through North Berwick to raise money for the charity Leuchie House, which provides respite for people with neurological conditions.

Here’s a look at some of the pieces on display.

STV News
STV News
STV News
STV News

Motorway speed limits ‘should be slower when it rains’

Drivers would like the standard 70mph limit reduced in wet conditions, survey for RAC finds.

Jeff J Mitchell via Getty Images
The motorway speed limit is currently 70mph, regardless of the weather conditions.

Most drivers want a lower motorway speed limit in wet weather, a new survey suggests.

The RAC poll of 2100 motorists indicated that 72% would like the standard 70mph limit cut in wet conditions to boost safety and encourage better driving habits.

Some 78% of respondents who supported a reduced motorway speed limit in the wet felt it would encourage some drivers to slow down, while 72% believed it was worth trying as it might save lives.

Nearly two-thirds said it could improve visibility due to less spray from moving vehicles.

ADVERT

Department for Transport figures show 246 people were killed or seriously injured on Britain’s motorways in 2019 when the road surface was damp, wet or flooded.

The Highway Code states that stopping distances in wet weather are at least double those on dry roads as tyres have less grip.

In France, motorway speed limits are reduced from 130km/h (80mph) to 110km/h (68mph) during inclement weather.

Of the UK drivers surveyed, 17% wanted the maximum legal speed in wet conditions cut to 65mph.

ADVERT

Some 33% wanted it to be 60mph, 8% were in favour of a 55mph limit, and 9% supported a reduction to 50mph.

A further 14% would like the limit reduced but are not sure by how much.

RAC data insight spokesman Rod Dennis said: “Statistically the UK has some of the safest motorways in Europe but it’s also the case that there hasn’t been a reduction in casualties of all severities on these roads since 2012, so perhaps there’s an argument for looking at different measures to help bring the number of casualties down.

“Overall, our research suggests drivers are broadly supportive of lower motorway speed limits in wet conditions, as is already the case across the Channel in France.

“And, while most drivers already adjust their speed when the weather turns unpleasant, figures show that ‘driving too fast for the conditions’ and ‘slippery roads’ are still among the top 10 reasons for motorway collisions and contribute to significant numbers of serious injuries and even deaths every year.

“The overall success of any scheme would of course depend on sufficient numbers of motorists reducing their speed, but even just a proportion reducing their speed in the wet would be likely to improve the safety of the UK’s motorways.”


Woman caught with scissors in jacket pocket jailed

Danielle Fowler was snared by police in Glasgow’s Hope Street at 4.30pm on October 14, 2020.

Scottish Courts and Tribunal Service via Website
Court: Danielle Fowler was jailed on Friday.

A convicted attempted murderer was caught in a busy city centre street with scissors in her jacket pocket.

Danielle Fowler was snared by police in Glasgow’s Hope Street at 4.30pm on October 14, 2020.

The 36-year-old had passed out and was searched by officers who were warned by members of the public.

Fowler had recently been released from an 11-year sentence for attempting to murder a vulnerable man.

ADVERT

Fowler and co-accused Mark Scobbie ambushed the man with punches, kicks and weapons at his flat in the city’s Lambhill in 2011.

The victim would have died from a blood clot to his brain without medical attention.

On Friday, Fowler pleaded guilty at Glasgow Sheriff Court to having scissors without a reasonable excuse or lawful authority.

The court heard Fowler was receiving medical attention from paramedics when officers went to assist.

ADVERT

Prosecutor Alasdair Knox said: “Officers were told by a member of the public that she was in possession of a knife.

“Due to her being unconscious, she was conveyed to an ambulance and in her jacket pocket a grey handled pair of scissors were recovered.”

Fowler was taken to Glasgow Royal Infirmary for treatment before she was arrested.

Her lawyer told the court Fowler was released from prison in April 2020 and was out on licence at the time.

Sheriff Tony Kelly jailed Fowler for ten months.

He said: “The court takes a dim view of offences such as this and only a custodial sentence is appropriate.”


Bus operators receive more cash to help cut emissions

The scheme has helped ensure that 762 buses can meet the more stringent emissions standards.

MarioGuti via IStock
The scheme has already provided £12.2m.

The Scottish Government is providing almost £6m of cash to help bus and coach operators go green.

The money is being made available to help transport operators meet the standards that will be in place in low emission zones (LEZs) which are being introduced in Scotland’s largest cities in 2022.

A total of £5.7m is now available from the Bus Emissions Abatement Retrofit Programme (BEAR) to help with the costs of reducing diesel emissions or converting the vehicles to electric.

The scheme has already provided £12.2m, which has helped ensure that 762 buses can meet the more stringent emissions standards.

ADVERT

Transport minister Graeme Dey said: “To protect public health and improve air quality, we’re continuing to support the introduction of Low Emission Zones across Scotland.

“Each fully occupied bus in our towns and cities can remove the equivalent of 75 cars from the road. It’s for this reason that choosing bus is already a positive choice for air quality – and even more so if that bus is retrofitted to meet emissions standards.

“Scotland has good air quality, but for the oldest and youngest in our society and those with existing health conditions, air quality remains an issue.

“It is critical that we have LEZs introduced in our four biggest cities by 2022, and this support is another way we’re helping bus, coach and community transport providers to comply with forthcoming emissions standards.”

ADVERT

Stevie More, engineering director at Lothian Buses, said “Lothian are fully committed to improving air quality across all our operations in Edinburgh and the Lothian’s, in line with the Scottish Government’s ambition to have the best air quality in Europe.

“This announcement from the Scottish Government of a further round of BEAR funding is welcomed by the industry as we all strive to meet the Low Emission Zone targets across Scotland.”


You're up to date

You've read today's top stories. Where would you like to go next?