Annie Lennox 'honoured' to have university building named after her

Glasgow Caledonian University's Hamish Wood building will be renamed after the Scots singer.

Annie Lennox ‘honoured’ to have Glasgow Caledonian University building named after her Email
Lennox: Singer said she is 'incredibly honoured' by the gesture.

Dr Annie Lennox OBE is set to be honoured by having a building at Glasgow Caledonian University named after her.

The singer was appointed as the first female chancellor of the university in 2018 and received an honorary doctorate in 2011 for her humanitarian work.

The Hamish Wood building – one of the university’s most distinguished – will be rebranded as the Annie Lennox building.

She will conduct a visit to the building and preside over three of the university’s summer graduation ceremonies, which will take place in person for the first time in two years at the Royal Concert Hall in Glasgow.

Lennox called the gesture an “incredible honour” and voiced her support to this year’s graduates.

She said: “I’m looking forward to taking part in GCU’s graduation ceremonies this week in person, after the last two years, when the only way we could connect was via Zoom.

Advertisement

“It’s an incredible honour to have such a wonderful building on the Glasgow Caledonian University campus named after me.

“I’m so proud of all the graduates, who’ve coped brilliantly with all the extra challenges, to finally succeed in reaching their goals and achievements.”

The building was previously named after Hamish Wood, a former professor at the university, who died in 2009.

GCU Principal and vice-chancellor, Professor Pamela Gillies CBE FRSE said: “Glasgow Caledonian University is extremely fortunate to have Dr Lennox as its chancellor.

“Her passion, wisdom, guidance and support for our community, especially through the recent challenges of the pandemic, have been transformative.

“Naming one of our most prominent buildings the ‘Annie Lennox Building’ is in recognition of everything she has done for the university, our students, and her wider life-changing work for the common good.”