Community farm reopens after being saved from closure

To mark the occasion, there will be a range of family-friendly activities and some well-known visitors.

Community farm reopens after being saved from closure
Reopening: LOVE Gorgie Farm

A celebration will be held as a community farm which faced permanent closure reopens its doors to the public.

More than £100,000 was donated by members of the public and the City of Edinburgh Council after Gorgie City Farm went into liquidation in November of last year.

And now to mark its reopening as LOVE Gorgie Farm, a range of familiy-friendly activities will be organised, while a number of known local faces are set to attend – including Hearts and Hibs footballers, Edinburgh and Scotland rugby players, politicians and council representatives.

From 9.30 to 11am children and adults will get the chance to feed the animals on the farm, which include pigs, sheep and goats, and can even take some newly arrived alpacas for a stroll.

There will also be face-painting and a henna tattooist on hand, as well as entertainment for all, including tombola, music and a photo booth.

Education and social care charity LOVE Learning took over the site of the former Gorgie City Farm in January.

LOVE Learning has organised a community consultation event, from 12pm to 2pm, where visitors can tell the new owners about their hopes for the future of the farm.

After the site opens its doors to the public it will remain open seven days a week and will be free for visitors.

Lynn Bell, chief executive of LOVE Learning said: “We are incredibly excited to be opening LOVE Gorgie Farm much earlier than we anticipated and we are hoping for a great turnout on Saturday.

“This will also provide the chance through our consultation exercise for the local community to provide its views on what people would like to see the farm used for in the future.

“I would like to thank the hundreds of volunteers who have given up their valuable time to help get the farm up and running earlier than anticipated. We could not have done it without their crucial role.

“Not only will the farm remain open seven days a week and remain free, but we will provide a range of exciting education, environmental and social care programmes supporting vulnerable individuals.”