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Under-threat Gorgie City Farm loved by Queen is saved

Gorgie City Farm, in Edinburgh, had faced closure after plunging into liquidation last year.

The Queen made a friend when she visited Gorgie City Farm last summer.
The Queen made a friend when she visited Gorgie City Farm last summer.

An under-threat community farm will remain open after a new operator was found.

Gorgie City Farm, in Edinburgh, had faced closure after plunging into administration last year.

But it been taken over by LOVE learning, a charity which works with vulnerable adults.

The farm, which was home to more than 100 animals and was visited by the Queen last summer, will remain open seven days a week and offer free entry.

Lynn Bell, CEO of LOVE learning, said: “We are incredibly excited to be taking on such a treasured resource as Gorgie City Farm.

“Not only will the farm remain open seven days a week and remain free, but we will provide a range of exciting education, environmental and social care programmes supporting vulnerable children and adults.”

Gorgie City Farm has welcomed around 200,000 visitors a year since it was saved from closure in 2016 after a successful crowdfunding appeal raised in excess of £100,000.

As well as being a visitor attraction, it is also a working farm and provides assisted volunteering experience for hundreds of people each year who face barriers to employment.

In July, the Queen visited the farm, where she met volunteers and was joined on a tour by a “cheeky duck who thinks she’s a human”.

The monarch was told about little Olive’s adventures, who had been known to wander out of the farm and get on a bus.

The four-year-old bird managed to steal the show as she waddled beside the Queen who was concluding her week of royal engagements in Scotland. Olive passed away in September.

The farm receives funding from City of Edinburgh Council, various grant-giving trusts and individual donors, and generates additional income through its cafe and animal boarding service.

Council leader Adam McVey said: “When the farm closed in November, I know many people worried this would be the end of such a unique venue.

“However, I’ve been hugely grateful for the outpouring of support and for everyone who has rallied round to get the farm back for our city.”


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